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Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from March 29th - April 4th

Wednesday March 29th: The State of Arts Criticism in Seattle

Doug McLennan, the founder of Arts Journal, talks with a panel of local critics including theater critic Misha Berson, the Seattle Times’s Brendan Kiley, former Seattle Weekly editor David Brewster, and, uh, me. We’ll be discussing why art criticism is being cut from local papers and why it’s currently in the hands of mostly middle aged white people. Folio: The Seattle Athenaem, 324 Marion St., 402-4612, http://folioseattle.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday March 29th: Burning Bright Reading

Thriller author Nick Petrie continues his series starring “damaged war veteran Peter Ash.” Petrie lives in Milwaukee, but he is a graduate of the University of Washington MFA fiction program, making this reading something of a homecoming. “Peter Ash” is a pretty great name for a thriller star — right up there with “Remo Williams” or “Lincoln Rhyme.” Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday March 30th: Up South Launch Party

Robert Lashley is one of the most powerful poets in the region. If you haven’t seen him read, you owe it to yourself to attend this debut for his second collection of poems: when the man reads, you have to pay attention. And when you pay attention, you’re rewarded with something new and beautiful. Jack Straw Gallery, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., 634-0919, http://jackstraw.org . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday March 31st: Kimberly Burwick and Kevin Goodan

Under the guidance of new owner Billie Swift, Open Books has really accelerated their reading series schedule, bringing both locally known and unknown poets to their stage. It would be a mistake to call Burwick and Goodan “unknown,” though. Burwick is an eastern Washingtonian and Goodan is from Montana, and they’re both widely read. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday April 1st: APRIL

See our event of the week column for more details. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. Noon.

Sunday April 2nd: Punk Rock Prose

Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, which shares space with a record store, hosts a rare prose-book event. A trio of authors who did time as punk rockers in Seattle — Danny Bland, Tom Hansen, and Jonathan Evison — welcome author Brian Jabas Smith, who’ll read from his new short story collection Spent Saints & Other Stories.

Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday April 3rd: The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley Reading

Fiction author Hannah Tinti’s new novel, The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley, is partially based on Whidbey Island. It in part references the Hercules myth. Tinti will be joined by Seattle novelist Laurie Frankel, whose This Is How It Always Is has been one of the most enjoyable reading experiences of my year so far. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday April 4th: The Stone Heart Reading

Vancouver cartoonist Faith Erin Hicks celebrates the second book in her comic book fantasy trilogy for young readers, The Stone Heart, with a Seattle audience. Tonight, she’ll be interviewed onstage by Seattle writer G. Willow Wilson, who is possibly best known as the creator of breakout superhero sensation Ms. Marvel. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from March 22nd - March 28th

Wednesday March 22nd: Lit Fix 4th Anniversary

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, http://chopsuey.com. Free. 21+. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday March 22nd: A Constitution for Economic Equality Reading

Law professor Ganesh Sitaraman has long advised Senator Elizabeth Warren on economic matters, making him a leading voice in the battle against economic inequality. Tonight, I’ll be in conversation with Sitaraman about his book, which could very well contain the key for Democratic victory in 2018. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday March 23rd: The Poetry Brothel

The Poetry Brothel is a touring cabaret featuring musical acts combined with so-called “poetry whores” who will present work onstage and, for a price, join you in a one-on-one private poetry session. Tonight’s performers include burlesque performer Jesse Belle-Jones, magician Josh Lamb, an aerialist named Holly Bordeaux, and house band Good Company. Rendezvous, 2322 2nd Ave., 441-5823, http://thepoetrybrothel.com . $25. 21+. 8:30 p.m.

Friday March 24th: The Idiot Reading

New Yorker writer Elif Batuman has only one other book to her name: a non-fiction account of people who are obsessed with Russian novelists. But her debut novel, The Idiot—about a Harvard freshman in the mid-1990s who falls in with some questionable Eastern European types—is earning praise from all quarters. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday March 25th: Growing Up in Public Reading

Georgetown’s Fantagraphics Bookstore and Gallery continues its recent trend of bringing international comics greats to Seattle with a rare appearance from Argentinian cartoonist Ezequiel Garcia. Garcia’s memoir, Growing Up in Public, is about life as a cartoonist in a society that continually devalues the importance of the arts. (Take notes, American cartoonists.) Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 1 p.m.

Sunday March 26th: Fire Girl and When Songbirds Returned to Paris Reading

Sayantani DasGupta’s debut essay collection, Fire Girl: Essays on India, America, and the In-Between, is from Port Townsend publisher Two Sylvias Press. E.M. Sloan’s When Songbirds Returned to Paris is a novelistic account of what happened when Sloan, spurred on by an old photograph, investigates a real-life slice of World War II history. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday March 27th: Man Overboard Reading

Seattle author J.A. Jance is a total workhorse, putting out one or two mysteries every year. Jance’s fan base is rabid for her work—many are completists who have read all the dozens of books she’s written. Her latest pits two tech geniuses against each other after a cruise ship mishap starts to look like murder. University Book Store Mill Creek, 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530. http://ubookstore.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday March 28th: Who Built Seattle? Reading

Seattle civil engineer Bob Ortblad will discuss Seattle history between 1853 and 1953, when our water, sewer, power, and transit systems all began and grew to take on the shapes that we see today. Ortblad will discuss the decisions we didn’t make as a city and the repercussions of the choices we did make. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from Wednesday March 15th - March 21st

Wednesday March 15th: WordsWest: Resistance and Immigration

The West Seattle reading series celebrates the Ides of March with a very timely theme. Seattle short story author Donna Miscolta (author of When the de La Cruz Family Danced) and West Seattle poet Shankar Narayan will read new work and talk about life in an America that seems to have rolled up the welcome mat. C&P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave. SW, http://wordswestliterary.weebly.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday March 16th: Beyond $15 Book Launch Party

Jonathan Rosenblum debuts his new book Beyond $15: Immigrant Workers, Faith Activists, and the Revival of the Labor Movement, an account of the fight for a $15 minimum wage in SeaTac. Rosenblum will be joined by Councilmember Kshama Sawant and other leaders of the movement to reflect and discuss the future. Washington State Labor Council, 321 16th Ave S., 281-8901, http://www.wslc.org/ . Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday March 17th: Ugly Time Book Launch Party

See our event of the week column for more details. Canvas Events Space, 3412 4th Ave. S., , http://gramma.press. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday March 18th: Exit West Reading

Mohsin Hamid writes novels about the world as it is now. His books are structurally adventurous and tuned to provocative issues like immigration, racism, and the War on Terror. His latest novel is about a young couple finding love in a world overrun with homeless refugees and fearful xenophobes. Piggott Auditorium, 901 12th Ave., 624-6600, http://www.elliottbaybookcompany.com All ages. 2 p.m.

Sunday March 19th: The Rules Do Not Apply Reading

New Yorker author Ariel Levy’s new memoir is about losing everything—a child, a husband, a successful career—and finding out what happens next. This book has received praise from all corners for its stark portrayal of grief and survival. She’ll be in conversation with Seattle memoirist Claire Dederer. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Monday March 20th: Free Women, Free Men Reading

In the 1990s, Camille Paglia was kind of a big deal: she was a controversial feminist who seemingly never turned down an opportunity to speak publicly. She fell out of favor after the turn of the millennium, but as the ancient Chinese proverb goes, if you live long enough, you get to see yourself critically reappraised. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday March 21st: Lovecraft Country and Everfair Reading

The Seattle-based authors of two of last year’s best novels—not just sci-fi novels, mind you, but novels in general—share a stage at Elliott Bay tonight. Matt Ruff celebrates the recent paperback release of his novel-in-stories, Lovecraft Country. Nisi Shawl’s steampunk alternate history Everfair is still in hardcover, but it is worth every penny. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from March 8 - March 14

Wednesday March 8th: Native Seattle Reading

Coll Thrush, a professor at the University of British Columbia, has two new books out. The first, Indigenous London, looks pretty neat. But we’re most interested in the new edition of Native Seattle, his history of Seattle’s native peoples. Today, Crosscut’s Knute Berger will interview Thrush about both books. Folio: The Seattle Athenaem, 324 Marion St., 402-4612, http://folioseattle.org. $10. 7 p.m.

Thursday March 9th: Tough Girl Reading

When she was 14 years old, Portland athlete Carolyn Wood won a gold medal in the 1960 Olympics. Her new memoir Tough Girl tells that story, but it also delves into her experiences growing up as a lesbian in the unforgiving public eye. This is a personal account of a remarkable life. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday March 10th: Vagrants & Accidentals Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday March 11th: The Immortal Irishman Reading

Tim Egan is one of our greatest literary exports. Hundreds of thousands read him in the New York Times every week, and his books are celebrated around the world. Today, he reads from his two most recent books about remarkable historical figures, The Immortal Irishman and Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher. Upper Level Center House, Seattle Center, 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. All ages. 3 p.m.

Sunday March 12th: Short Stories Live: McSweeney’s

Short Stories Live presents celebrated short stories read live by talented local performers. Today, the series plucks its three stories from postmodern literary journal McSweeney’s. Seattle actors will read McSweeney’s pieces by Spokane author Jess Walter, the world-famous Zadie Smith, and up-and-comer Nyuol Lueth Tong. Expect a lot of comedy and some dazzling sentences. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday March 13th: The Way of the Writer Reading

Retired UW professor Charles Johnson reads from his latest book, The Way of the Writer, which absorbs writing lessons Johnson learned from his more than five-decade-long career in literature and synthesizes them into easy-to-understand essays for aspiring writers of all ages. Part memoir, part how-to, and part spiritual guide, this book took Johnson a lifetime to write. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday March 14th: Ask the Oracle

The Hugo House’s ongoing divination/reading series, in which authors find answers to audience questions in randomly selected passages from their books, features memoirists Melissa Febos and Elissa Washuta and poet Quenton Baker. Washuta recently announced that she’s leaving Seattle this summer for a teaching position in Ohio, so go bask in her presence while you can. Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, hotelsorrento.com. Free. 21 and over. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from March 1st - March 7th

Wednesday March 1st: Reading Through It: Strangers in Their Own Land

The Seattle Review of Books and the Seattle Weekly present our monthly current-events book club. This edition focuses on Arlie Russell Hochschild’s Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right. Hoschchild, a sociologist from Berkeley, reports on what happened when she went to deep-red America to figure out what makes Republicans tick. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday March 1st: Ben Fountain

Okay, so Ang Lee’s film adaptation of Ben Fountain’s novel Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk was a total bust. But that doesn’t detract from the book: with his debut novel, Fountain stabbed into the heart of American self-regard. Come celebrate one of the brightest young talents to appear on the scene in the past decade. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, lectures.org. $2o. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday March 2nd: Finding Common Ground in America

On the long list of journalists who screwed up during the 2016 presidential election, you won’t find Matt Taibbi’s name. Unlike most pundits, the Rolling Stone writer never discounted the rise of Bernie Sanders or the victory of Donald Trump. Tonight, Taibbi joins progressive activist Joel Berg in conversation. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m. PAUL CONSTANT

Friday March 3rd: First Second Comics Panel

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday March 4th: Saturday on Mars!

Seattle author Kevin Emerson launches (haw-haw) his new sci-fi middle-reader novel Last Day on Mars, about a young man who lives on Mars after the destruction of Earth. The Bureau of Fearless Ideas celebrates with a fun party including a reading, cake, science experiments, and readings from young BFI writers. Bureau of Fearless Ideas, 8414 Greenwood Ave N., 725-2625, http://fearlessideas.org. All ages. 1 p.m.

Sunday March 5th: Words from the Cafe

Washington state’s poet laureate, Tod Marshall, helps celebrate a new book/cd compilation from local publisher Raven Chronicles Press. Edited by Anna Balint, Words from the Café allows Seattleites suffering from addiction, mental illness, and/or homelessness tell their own stories in their own words. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday March 6th: Paul Havas Reading

Art critic Matthew Kangas’s newest book, Paul Havas, focuses on the life, letters, and work of an underrated Seattle-area artist Paul Havas. Havas focused primarily on rural landscapes that were unmistakably Northwestern: gray skies over lush landscapes, mountains, calm waters reflecting tranquil scenes. Come learn about an important figure in the Northwest art tradition. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday March 7th: Artificial Emotional Intelligence

Richard Yonck has done a lot of thinking about what will happen when our machines think faster and more deeply than we do. His latest book, Heart of the Machine: Our Future in a World of Artificial Emotional Intelligence, investigates what might happen when we get out-thought by our own creations. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from February 22nd - February 28th

Wednesday February 22nd: The Burning World Reading

Hardcore zombie purists may not love Isaac Marion's young adult novel Warm Bodies — zombies who can talk? Sacrilege! — but everyone else seems to have fallen pretty hard. In the new sequel, the semi-alive protagonist learns how to reconnect with the human race and come to terms with his past. Bellevue Library, 1111, 110th Ave, 425-450-1765, http://kcls.org. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday February 23rd: Faggots in the Stacks

Likely due to its controversial name, the listing for this book group warns that “this event is not officially sponsored or endorsed by the Seattle Public Library.” Officially endorsed or not, it’s a must-attend discussion of Martin Duberman’s Hold Tight Gently, a true story of two artists during the AIDS epidemic. Capitol Hill Library, 425 Harvard Ave. E., 684-4715, http://wwwspl.org/. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday February 24th: It Was Written: Poetry Inspired by Hip-Hop Launch Party

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. 21+. 7 p.m.

Saturday February 25th: Adventures in Property Management Book Launch Party

Seattle author Chelsea Werner-Jatzke’s new book, Adventures in Property Management, is a chapbook from Sibling Rivalry Press. It’s a collection of (somewhat true) micro-fiction about a single apartment building. Tonight’s party features a reading from Werner-Jatzke along with guest appearances by local writers and a multimedia artist. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org.. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday February 26th: Laughing All the Way to the Mosque Reading

Zarqa Nawaz created a Canadian sitcom called Little Mosque on the Prairie. This afternoon, she debuts her new comedic memoir about being a Pakistani-Canadian experience, Laughing All the Way to the Mosque: The Misadventures of a Muslim Woman.Nawaz is in town for the Search for Meaning festival at Seattle University. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday February 27th: Gaslighting in Government

Two UW professors (David Domke, a communications expert, and Christopher Sebastian Parker, who specializes in political science) will talk with a mental health professional to discuss the idea of gaslighting — the imposing of a false reality upon an innocent victim who gradually accepts the fiction as real— and how that relates to the Trump administration. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday February 28th: Bridges Not Walls

Many Seattleites will be attending the reading from George Saunders for his debut novel Lincoln in the Bardo at Town Hall tonight. But this event, which features Seattle authors like Donna Miscola and Kathleen Alcalá, deserves your attention as well. This event is designed to examine who deserves a platform, and who you’re silencing when you speak. Seems appropriate for the time. Juan Alonso-Rodriguez Gallery, 206 S. Washington St. #104, 390-4882, http://www.ravenchronicles.org/bridges-not-walls. Free. All ages. 7 p.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from February 8th - February 14th

Wednesday February 8th: Life in a Fishbowl and Nowhere Near You Reading

Your week in readings kicks off with two young adult writers debuting their newest books. The latest book in Leah Thomas’s “Blunderkids” series featuring super-powered teenagers involves “an eyeless boy who prefers to be alone.” Len Vlahos’s novel is about a reality show featuring a family whose father who is dying of brain cancer. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday February 9th: 4 3 2 1 Reading

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $38. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Friday February 10th: Bushwick Book Club: Americanah

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah is one of the greatest novels to be published in the last five years. Actually, probably the last decade. Maybe the last 25 years? Seems likely. Tonight, Seattle musicians present new work based on the most recent Greatest American Novel. If they rise to the material, this will be a night to remember.Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . $10. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday February 11th: Mason Bee Revolution Reading

Remember in the days before Trump when we were all worried about the rampant death of bees? Well, even though we’re distracted by a different kind of apocalypse, bees are still dying in great numbers. Washington authors Dave Hunter and Jill Lightner explain how and why you should set up your own home bee colony Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 6:30 p.m.

Sunday February 12th: Born in Seattle Reading

Two Seattle authors who have written books about America’s need to redress our shameful history of Japanese internment read here tonight. Bob Shimabukuro wrote Born in Seattle: The Campaign for Japanese American Redress. Mira Shimabukuro wrote Relocating Authority: Japanese Americans Writing to Redress Mass Incarceration. They are father and daughter. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday February 13th: Ask the Oracle

The Sorrento Hotel and Hugo House’s whimsical series continues tonight with Claudia Rowe, author of the great, creepy book The Spider and the Fly, environmental poet JM Miller, and novelist Randy Sue Coburn. They will divine answers to audience questions from their own books Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, hotelsorrento.com. Free. 21 and over. 7 p.m.

Tuesday February 14th: What Is Love? Reading

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, philosopher Carrie Jenkins brings her book What Is Love? to Town Hall. She investigates the idea of romantic love in modern society. Jenkins applies her own polyamorous perspective to the concept of love, which will likely make this reading one of the most interesting Valentine’s Day dates you’ve ever attended. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from January 25th - January 30th

Wednesday January 25th: You’re the Most Beautiful Thing That Happened Reading

Arisa White’s latest book “takes its titles from words used internationally as hate speech against gays and lesbians.” She’s the visiting author who highlights a night of poetry written and read by powerful women of color — White is joined by Seattle authors Natasha Marin and Naa Akua. Fred Wildlife Refuge, 128 Belmont Ave. E., 322-7030. http://www.hugohouse.org. $10. 21+. 7 p.m.

Thursday January 26th: In the Cold

As Seattle prepares for the annual homeless survey — at the beginning of a year that will be dominated with discussion for how to deal with Seattle’s booming homeless population — our Civic Poet, Claudia Castro Luna hosts a reading and screening of a film to remind us of the human side behind the numbers. City Hall Plaza, 600 4th Ave. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday January 27th: The Undoing Project Reading

Ever since The Big Short and Moneyball became runaway sensations, every new Michael Lewis book has become an event. His newest book documents the unconventional team of two Nobel Prize-winning Israeli psychologists. Lewis appears in conversation with Steve Scher to discuss how our understanding of decision-making was changed forever in their work. University Temple United Methodist Church, 1415 NE 43rd Ave. http://ubookstore.com. $32.78. 7 p.m.

Saturday January 28th: The Poet Is In

After speaking out for homeless Seattleites on Thursday, Civic Poet Claudia Castro Luna makes herself available to Seattleites who’d like to make “poetic explorations” into their city. Castro Luna has been a ferocious advocate for poetry in Seattle; if you have any embarrassing questions that you’d like answered in a nonjudgmental fashion, this is your big chance. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Sunday January 29th: Residencies Revealed

Residencies are one of the best parts of being a writer: you get a roof over your head and time (and permission) to do nothing but sit there and write. Today, representatives from Northwest residencies and local writers will talk about what they’re like, how to get them, and which residencies are right for you. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday January 30th: Freebird Reading

See our Literary Event of the Week Column for more details. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m. PAUL CONSTANT

Tuesday January 31st: Loud Mouth Lit

Playwright and memoirist Paul Mullin has been thinking a lot about what makes readings special. His brand-new reading series looks to combine the smarts of a literary reading with the energy of a theatrical production. Tonight’s debut Loud Mouth Lit features Mullin alongside Scot Augustson, who’ll tell a story about time travel and corpses. St. Andrews Bar & Grill, 7406 Aurora Ave N, 523-1193, https://www.facebook.com/LoudMouthLit/. Free. 21+. 8 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from January 18th - January 24th

Wednesday January 18th: WordsWest 22

West Seattle’s liveliest reading series begins 2017 with Hugo House Writer-in-Residence Anastacia Renee Tolbert and Seattle Times reporter Claudia Rowe, whose brand-new true crime book The Spider and the Fly tells the true story of her correspondence with a serial killer. The two writers will read on the theme of “dreams deferred.” C&P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave. SW, http://wordswestliterary.weebly.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday January 19th: A Word for Love Reading

Visiting author Emily Robbins’s debut novelA Word for Love is about an exchange student who travels to Syria, falls in love with the language, and then falls in love with a Syrian. Robbins, who studied in Syria on a Fulbright Fellowship, will likely have some things to say about the intersection of fiction and nonfiction. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday January 20th: Occupy Inauguration

Technically this isn’t a reading, but the truth is, the We Defy event with Sherman Alexie and Ijeoma Oluo at Town Hall tonight is already sold out (though they do often have standby tickets at the door if you feel like waiting in line) and tonight is a night for political action. Go be heard. Westlake Park, 401 Pine St., http://www.seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/westlake-park Free. 5 p.m.

Saturday January 21st: Bushwick Book Club

See our Event of the Week Column for more details. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages 8 p.m.

Sunday January 22nd: Looking for Betty MacDonald Reading

Betty MacDonald’s 1945 memoir about life on the Olympic Peninsula, The Egg and I, is an underappreciated Northwest classic. Seattle-area historian Paula Becker celebrates the UW Press’s republication of three long out-of-print books by MacDonald with a reading from her book which celebrates MacDonald’s history and legacy. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday January 23rd: The Revolution Where You Live Reading

Author Sarah van Gelder is a co-founder of the Bainbridge Island-based Yes! Magazine. Today, she debuts her new book, The Revolution Where You Live: Stories from a 12,000 Mile Journey Through a New America. Hopefully, she has some ideas for a new form of activism. Lord knows we need it. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday January 24th: This Is How It Always Is Reading

No less a towering talent than the Northwest’s own Ruth Ozeki praises Seattle author Laurie Frankel’s third novel, This Is How It Always Is, for charging us “to look beyond the traditional binary oppositions of boy vs. girl, right vs. wrong, real vs. make-believe, and to find courage and beauty in the in-between.” Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from January 11th - January 17th

Wednesday January 11th: Cat Rambo and Margaret Chiavetta

Two Seattle-based fantasy authors debut new work at Seattle’s best sci-fi bookstore. If you’ve been involved in our sci-fi community, you likely know Rambo’s name. Her newest book, Neither Here Nor There, is a collection of fantasy stories. You can see a tiny version of the nifty flip-cover format of the book right above this calendar entry. Chiavetta’s Sir Duffy’s Promise is the first in a new middle-reader fantasy series University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday January 12th: Leaving the Planet Opening Reception

Greg Stump’s deceptively simple comics are Seattle’s best-kept secret. From his early-2000s comic contributions to The Stranger to his magnum opus Disillusioned Illusions, Stump has been gradually stripping away all artifice to discover a kind of cartooning nirvana. Tonight, Stump kicks off his first non-comics art show with Leaving the Planet, an ink-and-watercolor extravaganza showcase. Joe Bar, 810 E. Roy St., 324-0407. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday January 13th: Indigenous London Reading

Canadian history professor Coll Thrush, who wrote a terrific history of indigenous Seattle, returns with a book about the history of native peoples from America and New Zealand who traveled to the very center of the British Empire from the 16th century onward. This is a fascinating new twist on the study of colonialism. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday January 14th: Bring on 2017!

Open Books, under the guidance of new owner Billie Swift, has been kicking ass with its reading series lately. The store kicks off a new year of literary events with a reading from four Seattle-area poets: Samar Abulhassan, Natasha Marin, Imani Sims, and Anastacia Renee Tolbert. Come join the party. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://www.openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday January 15th: Writers Resist: A Celebration of Free Speech

It seems impossible that this week will bring both the annual celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Donald Trump’s inauguration. But here we are. To mentally prepare for the discord to come, why not attend this freedom-minded reading by writers from Bellingham (Robert Lashley) and Spokane (novelist Jess Walter, poet Tod Marshall) and Seattle (Elissa Washuta, Jane Wong, G. Willow Wilson)? Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Monday January 16th: Something Special

The Egyptian Theatre is so beautiful and so welcoming that I’ve always thought it was kind of a shame that nobody ever hosted a reading there. Tonight, my dream comes true: Something Special is a multimedia celebration of short films, music (from Cosmos the Band) and spoken word (from Nikkita Oliver, Troy Osaki, and Leija Farr.) Egyptian Theatre, 805 E. Pine St., 324-9996, http://www.siff.net. $10. All ages. 9 p.m.

Tuesday January 17th: Conflict Is Not Abuse Reading

See our event of the week column for more details.Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://www.spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from January 4th - January 10th

Wednesday January 4th: Reading Through It: A Post-Election Book Club

See our Event of the Week column for details. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday January 4th: Contagious Exchanges

If you’re not attending a book club with the Seattle Review of Books and the Seattle Weekly, you should be at Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s queer literary salon series, which this month features two of the funniest writers in Seattle: poet/essayist Sarah Galvin and essayist/monologuist David Schmader. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday January 5th: The Expense of a View Reading

Polly Buckingham has long been a literary force out of eastern Washington — she helped found StringTown Press and she edits at Willow Springs Books. Tonight, she reads from her new story collection with the help of another eastern Washington gem — Spokane poet Nance Van Winckel, whose most recent collection is a “poetically altered encyclopedia,” which sounds fascinating. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday January 6th: This Glittering Republic Reading

Seattle poet Quenton Baker hit it big late last year when he debuted his first collection, This Glittering Republic. His poems look at history and race and intergenerational burdens with a fresh eye. Baker is funny and brilliant and just about the closest thing to a voice of reason you can find in America, 2017. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday January 7th: The End of My Career Reading

Seattle author Corinne Manning, who just stepped down from her leadership role as founder of the James Franco Review, will appear in conversation with memoirist Martha Glover, whose new book is about investigating workers’ comps claims for the state. The world of work is a troubling, complicated one, and Glover provides a unique perspective. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday January 8th: Stories from the Saturday Evening Post

It seems likely that this year will bring with it even more magazine closures, and that’s a goddamn shame. This reading of popular Saturday Evening Post pieces — in which local performers read work by P.G. Wodehouse, Robert Heinlein, and Shirley Jackson — ought to demonstrate what magazines, at their very best, are capable of promoting. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $10-13. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday January 9th: The Secret Life of Fat Reading

Sylvia Tara is a biochemist, and she’s about to give you a terrific reason to quit your New Year’s resolution before it even begins. The Secret Life of Fat examines the complicated role that fat plays in our lives: we hate it, even though it’s necessary to survive and it’s trying to protect us. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday January 10th: Salon of Shame

We’ve all got some residual shame in us after the godawful mess that was last year. That’s what makes the Salon of Shame so important: it’s like a ritual burning of shame, in which normal Seattleites gather to read their most embarrassing teenage writings. Come — be embarrassed, and then be free. Theatre Off Jackson, 409 7th Ave, http://brownpapertickets.com . $15. All ages. 8 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from December 28th - January 3rd

Wednesday December 28th: Play It As It Lays Book Club

Booksellers at the south end’s newest bookstore discuss the divine Joan Didion’s 1970 novel Play It As It Lays. Didion is (rightfully) best known for her nonfiction, but her novels are in danger of being entirely forgotten. Let Thid Place’s Anje and Wesley help you understand why that would be an absolute crime. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday, December 30th: 2016 Fuck Off

The owners of Seattle’s newest comics store, the recently Kickstarted Outsider Books in Fremont, is closing out the year with a party that includes a sale on comics, food and drink, some games, and information about how to get involved in your local community. If you haven’t checked out Outsider yet, this is the perfect excuse. Outsider Books, 223 N. 36th St., 535-8886, http://outsidercomics.com/. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday January 1st: Third Place Books Book Sale

This has become a Seattle new year’s tradition: every branch of Third Place Books—including this year’s new edition, the Seward Park store, kick off the new year with a giant 20% off sale of every book on their shelves. Go stock up for the winter. Third Place Books Locations, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

[CORRECTION: An earlier version of this post claimed that Third Place Books was selling only used books at 20 percent off on January 1st. In fact, they're selling every book, new and used, at 20 percent off.]

Tuesday January 3rd: Dimension’s Edge Book Club

The popular Mill Creek sci-fi book club discusses Patrick Rothfuss’s fantasy novel The Name of the Wind, about the life and times of “the most notorious magician his world has ever seen.” Yes, even more notorious than that creepy David Blaine. Think of it as Harry Potter, only with more crime and smut. University Book Store Mill Creek, 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530. ubookstore.com. Free. All ages. 6:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from December 21st - December 27th

Wednesday December 21st: Take Back the Sky Reading

Prolific Seattle sci-fi author Greg Bear delivers one of the last readings of the year at University Book Store. His latest novel is about a marooned group of space soldiers who await the arrival of a malevolent alien force they call “The Antagonists.” Bear’s book is a sci-fi military epic that travels across the universe to discover the secret of life. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday December 22nd: Punk Rock Flea Market

Those of you who have lived in Seattle long enough to remember the Value Village on 11th can probably automatically summon the store’s smell to mind — a dusky blend of creosote and loved objects. You can experience that smell one last time as the building hosts Punk Rock Flea Market before being destroyed in the new year. Find all kinds of treats from local vendors—including literary artists like erasure poet Jenessa Wright—for three days only, before it’s all torn down.
Value Village Building, 1525 11th Ave, http://punkrockfleamarketseattle.com. $1. All ages. 4 p.m.
Monday December 26th: Rainier Beach Library Tours

Seattle, happily, is a city that votes to support its libraries. Today, the Rainier Beach branch of SPL is hosting half-hour tours all day long to show off all the renovations it has recently hosted. Learn about the library and check out the building’s new look. If you’re lucky, the space might still have that new library smell. Rainier Beach Public Library, 9125 Rainier Ave S., 386-1906, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. Noon.

Tuesday December 27th: Feminist Fight Club Reading

Leaning in is so three years ago: Jessica Bennett says it’s time for working women to punch back. Her new book is a “guide to navigating subtle sexism at work, providing real-life career advice and humorous reinforcement for a new generation of professional women.” Let’s go crush the patriarchy. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from December 14th - December 20th

Wednesday December 14th: Lit Fix and Origin Stories

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details.

Thursday December 15th: Hola and Goodbye Reading

Seattle author Donna Miscolta’s new book of linked short stories, Hola and Goodbye follows multiple generations of women in a Latinx family as they come to America and forge new paths for themselves, facing tremendous sexism, racism, and economic barriers. This is a heartfelt American story that was published at exactly the right time. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday December 17th: Holiday Story Time

Elliott Bay Book Company traditionally hosts kids’ readings on Saturday mornings. (They’ve been much better-attended since the store moved from Pioneer Square to Capitol Hill.) The final edition of the year is a special holiday-themed reading for kids read by “a local Seattle actor.” Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 11 a.m.
Monday December 19th: The Beautiful Struggle

In a conversation facilitated by the good people at Seattle Public Library, Luzviminda Uruzi "Lulu" Carpenter leads Seattle-area LGBTQ leaders (including Dominique Stephens, Luis Fernando Ramirez, and Sonj Basha) in a conversation about surviving violence of all stripes (racism, transphobia) and building communities together. Gay City, 517 E Pike St., 860-6969, http://spl.org. Free. All ages.

Tuesday December 20th: How the Grinch Stole Christmas Reading

How the Grinch Stole Christmas is a holiday classic that even managed to survive the apocalyptic threat of that Jim Carrey-starring abomination that Hollywood shat up a while back. Today, University Book Store hosts a reading of Dr. Seuss’s Christmas classic for young audiences. Take part in the tradition. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 11 a.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from December 7 - December 13

Wednesday December 7th: Reading Through It: A Post-Election Book Club

Join the Seattle Weekly and the Seattle Review of Books as we try to make sense of Donald Trump’s America in a new monthly book club. Tonight, we’ll discuss J.D. Vance’s memoir Hillbilly Elegy. We’ll also be choosing the book for our February club based on your recommendations. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday December 8th: The Angel of History Reading

Rabih Alameddine is one of the preeminent Arab-American voices in fiction today. His newest novel is about a gay Yemeni-Lebanese expatriate living in America during the AIDS epidemic and the post-9/11 security state. It’s a heartbreaking story of memory, identity, history, and culture, which makes it about as American as it gets. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday December 9th: We Told You So: Comics as Art Panel

To celebrate the release of a giant new book chronicling their first 40 years in the publishing business, Fantagraphics Books kicks off a weekend full of events by convening a star-studded panel of cartoonists (Los Bros Hernandez! Jim Woodring! Ellen Forney! Carol Tyler!) to discuss the high and low points of the greatest comics publisher in the United States. Folio: The Seattle Athenaem, 324 Marion St., 402-4612, folioseattle.org. Free.

Saturday December 10th: Opting Out Early Release Party

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Arundel Books, 209 Occidental Avenue S., 624.4442, http://arundelbooks.com Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday December 11th: The Journey of Our Names

Seattle poet Aaron Counts teaches a free writing class on the importance of names, from family names to nicknames to adopted names. Every name is a story, and Counts will teach you how to plumb the meaning behind your name for a whole new level of understanding. Beacon Hill Public Library, 2821 Beacon Ave S. http://spl.org. 684-4711. 2 p.m.

Monday December 12th: Countdown to Pearl Harbor Reading

This month marks 75 years since the attack on Pearl Harbor. If your only understanding of Pearl Harbor begins and ends with that awful Ben Affleck movie, you owe it to yourself to attend this reading from Steve Twomey’s new book, which charts the path to America’s involvement in World War II. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday December 13th: Seattle Fiction Federation #8

The eighth edition of this reading series, in which the audience selects one open mic reader to headline the next outing, features Seattle writers Steve Sibra, Anca L. Szilágyi, and Donna Miscolta reading alongside SFF#7 winner Lucy Hitz. If you perform at the post-reading open mic, you might headline the 9th SFF. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 30 - December 6

Wednesday November 30th: My Old Man and the Mountain Reading

The youngest son of “Big Jim” Whittaker, the first American to climb Mount Everest, is also a mountain climber. Maybe Leif Whittaker can explain what the deal is with his bizarre family business — everybody knows the punchline “because it’s there,” but what really makes two generations of a family decide to climb mountains? Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday December 1st: Moonglow Reading

Michael Chabon’s latest novel combines rocket science, deathbed confessions, and family secrets into one memoirish novel. Ostensibly a story about Chabon’s dying grandfather, Moonglow is quieter and more direct than some of his other novels, and its realism and relatively simple sentences might open Chabon up to a new audience. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday December 2nd: The Furnace Says Goodnight

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Hollow Earth Radio, 2018 E. Union St., 617-1683, hollowearthradio.org. Free. All ages. 8 p.m.

Saturday December 3rd: Rainier Valley Lit Crawl

The fourth Rainier Valley Lit Crawl centers around Hillman City, venturing to, in order, Spinnaker Bay, Big Chickie, Adugenet, and Union Bar. Those four venues will host an array of authors including Daemond Arrindell, Sarah León, Fernando Pérez, Jekeva Phillips, Anastacia Renee, Thomas Walton, and Corina Zappia. Spinnaker Bay, 5718 Rainier Ave S., 725-2337, http://gregbem.com/. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday December 4th: Urban Craft Uprising

Seattle’s largest craft show is a great place to cross off all the last-minute gifts on your holiday shopping list. You can find a little bit of everything here, but be sure to visit the seven papercraft exhibitors, including journal makers, book arts experts, and letterpress printers. Seattle Center Exhibition Hall, 4326 301 Mercer St, http://urbancraftuprising.com Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

Monday December 5th: Thank You for Being Late Reading

This reading from Thomas Friedman’s latest book, Thank You for Being Late, is ostensibly sold out, but many Town Hall events have last-minute seating available for people who show up and wait in line. Friedman’s latest book — about technology, globalization, and climate change — looks like it’s worth a few minutes of standing in the cold. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday December 6th: The Way of the Writer Reading

Charles Johnson is a Seattle-area legend. The UW professor and National Book Award-winning novelist’s latest book collects a lifetime of learning under the ambitious title The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art and Craft of Storytelling. Tonight, Johnson will talk onstage with one of his prize students, the novelist David Guterson. Northwest African American Museum, 2800 S. Massachusetts St., 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Literary Event of the Week: The Furnace Says Goodnight

The catchphrase of The Furnace reading series is descriptive, intense, and memorable: “One Writer. One Story. Read to completion (with vigor).” It’s oddly sexual in tone — I can think of no other reading series in Seattle that is described with the same language as a handjob — but it’s exactly what you get when you show up for a Furnace reading.

Founded by Seattle writers Anca Szilagyi and Corinne Manning in 2012, the quarterly Furnace series has brought one writer to Hollow Earth Radio’s studios before a live studio audience to read a story that incorporates audio elements like music and sound effects. The reading is broadcast live on Hollow Earth, and audio recordings live forever on their website. If you’re looking for particular recordings to sample, the top two recordings on the Furnace’s Sound and Video page are great places to start.

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s story “The Freezer Door” circulates through her interests: the increasingly conformist attitudes of modern American cities, sexuality, and the complexities of attraction. She moved to San Francisco in 1992 and joined in on the seemingly never-ending parade of hookup culture. Everyone, at the time, was kissing everyone. She explains, “this kiss didn’t necessarily feel like a radical act; it was just something you did when you were a faggot.”

And possibly the best Furnace is from October of 2015: Anastacia Renee Tolbert’s story “The City.” In her introduction, Szilagyi calls Tolbert “a queer superhero of color,” and that’s just about right. Not many poets would have the guts to read a narrative poem featuring the city of Seattle as a protagonist, but Tolbert pulls it off and makes it look effortless. Over a droning retro electronic soundtrack created by local sound collective WINDOWS95SECONDEDITION, Tolbert reads, “this city sits on itself like a tired woman after a long day of being black…we are beautiful in the rain because the rain makes us blurry.”

It’s a Seattle in crisis, a Seattle trying to find its own voice, a city distracted by coffee and body image. It’s the Seattle out our window. Later in “The City,” Tolbert announces that in Seattle, “we all have a story to tell and that’s why there are so many writers here.” That could just as easily have been an alternate, non-handjobby catchphrase for the Furnace, too.

This Friday, Manning and Szilagyi will present the last-ever Furnace reading. (“Corinne and Anca love you forever but we are in our 30s and need to finish our books,” a notice on The Furnace site says.) They’re violating one of the cardinal rules of the series with the finale: the final Furnace will feature not one writer but an army of them, made up of Furnace alumni including Sycamore, Tolbert, Chelsea Werner-Jatzke, Nancy Jooyoun Kim, and Buffy Aakaash. Szilagyi and Manning will fold contributions from all the writers together into a single story, with a soundtrack by WINDOWS95SECONDEDITION and The Shtick Figures. It will undoubtedly be read to completion (with vigor.)

Hollow Earth Radio, 2018 E. Union St., 617-1683, hollowearthradio.org. Free. All ages. 8 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 23rd - November 29th

Wednesday November 23rd: Read Hillbilly Elegy

If you haven't already, please start reading J.D. Vance's Hillbily Elegy so you can discuss it with us at our Reading Through It book club, which happens on December 7th at Third Place Books Seward Park.

Thursday November 24th: Happy Thanksgiving!

Eat, drink, and try not to think about who's going to be president in less than two months.

Friday November 25th: Read a Book You Already Own

Check out of all the Black Friday nonsense by staying home with a book you've bought but not read. Think of it as past you buying present you a gift. Don't go to a mall. Stay home and relax.

Saturday November 26th: Indies First Party Bus

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Various locations. Free. All ages. Noon – 5 p.m.

Sunday November 27th: Visit a Library

We still live in a country in which public libraries are open and available to the public. I mean, really: why wouldn't you visit a public library?

Monday November 28th: LOUD IDIOTS Reading

Baltimore poet and short story writer Sarah Jean Alexander reads in Seattle for the very first time to celebrate her new book, LOUD IDIOTS. She’s joined by two of the guiding lights of the soon-to-be-nonexistent APRIL Festival, Frances Chiem and Willie Fitzgerald, along with Seattle-area writer Richard Chiem. Vermillion, 1508 11th Ave, http://vermillionseattle.com/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday November 29th: Two Sarahs Read Poetry

Sarah Riggs has written five books of poetry and she’s also also directed films, including Six Lives: A Cinepoem. Riggs has come all the way from New York City to celebrate the latest book of poetry by Seattle author Sarah Mangold, the excellently titled Giraffes of Devotion. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 16th - November 22nd

Wednesday November 16th: WordsWest Literary Series

This West Seattle-centric reading series features Imani Sims (whose poem “Allure” begins “She was perfect pitcher,/Cooled glass and ice center”) and Alma García, a writer of short stories (and, recently, a novel) who writes about the Latinx experience and what an appropriate size would be for a “dog-sized” dog. C&P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave. SW, http://wordswestliterary.weebly.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday November 17th: Dock Street Salon

This reading series brings fine literary writers to the beautiful neighborhood bookstore, Phinney Books. Tonight’s readers are novelists Tobias Carroll and Jarret Middleton, and short story author Matthew Simmons, who is the author of the new collection The In-Betweens. Simmons writes about road trips and jackalopes and black metal. Phinney Books, 7405 Greenwood Ave. N., 297-2665, http://phinneybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday November 18th: Michelle Tea, Donna Kaz, Jordan O’Jordan

As Sarah Galvin noted in her excellent review, Michelle Tea is an iconic memoirist and queer sex symbol. Her newest book, Black Wave, is a memoir with a dystopic novel laid over the top, which kind of resembles the world in which we live right now. Tea is joined by memoirist Donna Kaz and musician Jordan O’Jordan. Fred Wildlife Refuge, 128 Belmont Ave. E., 322-7030. http://www.hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday November 19th: Seattle Seven Holiday Bookfest

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Phinney Neighborhood Center, 6532 Phinney Ave, http://seattle7writers.org. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Sunday November 20th: Run the Red Lights Reading

With his thoughtful, funny poems, Ed Skoog was one of the best writers in Seattle. Then he had to move away. But this city still fucking loves him to pieces. Today, he debuts his new title from Port Townsend publisher Copper Canyon Press with a signing at Seattle’s best (and only, but still best) poetry bookstore. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. Noon.

Monday November 21st: Extreme Makeover and Every Heart a Doorway Reading *

Dan Wells’s newest fantasy novel is titled Extreme Makeover, and it’s about an anti-aging hand cream that “overwrites the DNA of whoever is wearing it.” Wells reads with novelist Seanan McGuire, whose Every Heart a Doorway is about a boarding school for magical children that is plagued by a serial killer. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday November 22nd: Habitat and Ancestor Reading

Simon Roy, the comics artist behind the new sci-fi series Habitat, signs the first collection of his book, which is about an orbital space station that is hurtling toward civil war. Roy is joined by writer Matt Sheean and artist Malachi Ward, who will sign their new collected comic Ancestor, about a mind-computer interface. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 9th - November 15th

Wednesday November 9th: Sacred Breath

This is the first in a new quarterly storytelling series by UW’s Department of American Indian Studies featuring (mostly local) indigenous poets, spoken word storytellers, and other assorted kinds of writers. The featured authors for the inaugural edition are Payton Bordley, Sasha LaPointe, and Roger Fernandes. UW Intellectual House, 4249 Whitman Court, University of Washington Campus, https://ais.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday November 10th: Now for the Disappointing Part Book Launch

Seattle writer Steven Barker made a big splash in 2013 with a GeekWire piece titled “An open letter to Jeff Bezos: A contract worker’s take on Amazon.com.” Tonight, he launches a whole book about life in the contract-work economy, subtitled A Pseudo-Adult’s Decade of Short-Term Jobs, Long-Term Relationships, and Holding Out for Something Better. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org.. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday November 11th: The *Seattle Review of Books Presents Sherman Alexie, Robert Lashley, and EJ Koh

See our Literary Event of the Week Column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Friday November 11th: Red Badge Project's Women Veteran Reading

Because the Seattle Review of Books is co-producing the previous event at Elliott Bay Book Company, we'd like to provide an alternate, conflict-of-interest-free event for you to consider. And this looks like a great cause: Seattle authors Suzanne Morrison and Sonya Lea present a reading from their Red Badge Project, which invites an audience "to hear the stories of women veterans in this remarkable evening to honor their service, on Veteran's Day." Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave., http://https://www.facebook.com/events/1808684429377526/, 7 p.m., all ages, free.

Saturday November 12th: Hola and Goodbye Book Launch Party

Seattle author Donna Miscolta launches her new collection of short stories, which charts the progress of a Latinx family across three generations. In a time when the Republican Party is trying as hard as they can to demonize immigrants, this book celebrates the immigrant experience. This publication party features music from Acustico Perfecto. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday November 13th: Book Launch Times Two

It’s a week to launch books into the world, apparently. This evening, Open Books is host to two book launches at once: Ellen Welcker presents her newest poetry collection Ram Hands and Tim Greenup’s new book of poetry is titled Without Warning. Greenup writes poetry about corn mazes and wild animals. Welcker writes poems about babies and “butt holders.” Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday November 14th: Mapping the Heavens Reading

Priyamvada Natarajans is an astrophysicist. Her new book aims to make sense out of the mysteries of the cosmos. Mapping the Heavens explains dark matter, black holes, and the expansion of the universe. If it helps, think of it as astrology, only it’s actually based in facts and it can’t help predict if you’re getting laid this weekend. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday November 15th: Future Sex Reading

Emily Witt’s new book examines modern sexuality, from online dating to changing opinions about polyamory. Future Sex is part memoir, part investigative journalism, part profile of sexual subcultures. And all together, those different narrative threads combine to form a portrait of what it means to be a sexual woman in the 21st century. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.