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Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 16th - August 22nd

Wednesday August 16th: Why Poetry Reading

Matthew Zapruder isn’t a Seattle poet, but he edits for Seattle-based Wave Books and he publishes with Port Townsend-based Copper Canyon Press. His newest book is a self-described “impassioned call for a return to reading poetry” titled Why Poetry. While generally demands that people should read poetry are like telling kids to eat broccoli, Zapruder is a brainy and passionate advocate. Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, http://hotelsorrento.com. Free. 21 and over. 7 p.m.

Thursday August 17th: Darkansas Reading

Seattle writer Jarret Middleton’s first novel, An Dantomine Eerly, was a surrealistic book about the death of a poet. His second, Darkansas, is about a country singer who comes home to the Ozarks to attend his twin brother’s wedding. Meanwhile, his father’s ghost lingers over the proceedings and things get really creepy. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday August 18th: The Pox Lover Reading

Everyone’s favorite interlocutor, Seattle’s own Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, interviews journalist Anne-Christine d’Adesky about her memoir of lesbian activism and global refugees. Sarah Schulman says the book is “Reminiscent of the luscious lesbian literature of the Parisian past but propelled into the era of AIDS, ACT UP, and the Lesbian Avengers.” Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday, August 19th: Fun Home Book Club

Now that all the drama nerds are excited about Fun Home because of the musical that just came to town, it’s important to recall that Alison Bechdel’s first memoir is a complex and beautiful work of literature on its own. Come talk about one of the best comics of the last 20 years with a group of comics fans. Outsider Comics and Geek Boutique, 223 N. 36th St., 535-8886, http://outsidercomics.com/. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday August 20th: Cephalopod Appreciation Society

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Waterfront Space, 1400 Western Ave., https://www.facebook.com/CephalopodAppreciationSociety/ Free. All ages. Noon.

Monday August 21st: Booze and Lasers: All the Birds in the Sky

We tend to have fewer readings at this time of year, which means it’s time for you to visit some book clubs! This new boozy book discussion group is devoted to appreciating recent sci-fi gems by women and authors of color. Their most recent selection is Charlie Jane Anders’s sci-fi-and-fantasy mashup, All the Birds in the Sky. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday August 22nd: Found: A Life in Mountain Rescue Reading

Bree Loewen is the leader of Seattle Mountain Rescue, a volunteer organization that saves the lives of people who get lost in the wilderness. Her memoir about those rescues — successful and not, famous and obscure — builds into a portrait of the region’s outdoor community. Read it while you’re still able to get out to the mountains for a few more weeks. King County Library, Redmond Branch, 15990 NE 85th St,, 425-885-1861, http://kcls.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 9th - August 15th

Wednesday August 9th: The Grip of It Reading

Jac Jemc is one of the finest young(ish) visiting writers who read at the APRIL Festival. Tonight, she celebrates the release of her latest novel, a haunted house story with the exceptional title The Grip of It, with APRIL co-founder and Seattle author Tara Atkinson. Expect creepy fun and literary excellence. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday August 10th: The Clockwork Dynasty Reading

Daniel H. Wilson’s novels about the robot uprising of the future, Robopocalypse and Robogenesis are two modern classics in the geeky sci-fi canon. His latest book, The Clockwork Dynasty, looks instead to the past, unveiling a secret society of robots who have changed the course of human history. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday August 11th: Earth as It Is Reading

In the new novel by Jan Maher, a young woman in the 1930s walks in on her husband as he’s trying on her lingerie. She leaves him. He leaves Texas behind to move to Chicago and finds a cross-dressing subculture. Will he be able to come to terms with his secret life? University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday, August 12th: Casino: A Palimpsest

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Frye Art Museum. 704 Terry Ave., 622-9250, http://fryemuseum.org. Free. All ages. 11 a.m.

Sunday August 13th: Secrets of the Weird Reading

Author Chad Stroup’s latest urban fantasy takes place on the streets of a town called Sweetsville, where a drug called Sweet Candy makes wishes come true. What do neo-Nazis and unlicensed surgeons and cults have to do with it? Look, you’ll have to read the damn book to find out.

University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday August 14th: New People Reading

Danzy Senna is one of the very most interesting social writers the 21st century has yet to produce. Her long-awaited new novel, New People, is about a biracial couple who find themselves divided along lines that they don’t fully comprehend. Senna explodes American conceptions of class and race in ways that will make readers completely uncomfortable. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday August 15th: Capitol Hill History

If you’re the kind of person who learns more by doing and seeing, you should take David Williams’s most recent book, Seattle Walks: Discovering History and Nature in the City out on a stroll. In a time of relentless growth, it’s important to remember what came before. Tonight, Williams will talk with two board members of the new Capitol Hill Historical Society. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 2nd - August 8th

Wednesday August 2nd: Reading Through It: Evicted

Join the Seattle Review of Books and the Seattle Weekly in the latest of our monthly book discussion series. This month’s book, the Pulitzer Prizewinning Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, is the first selection that could possibly evoke absolutely no discussion of President Trump. Come talk about why the rent is so damn high with us! Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m

Thursday August 3rd: X Y Z Gallery Opening

See our Event of the Week column for more details. X Y Z Gallery, 300 S Washington St, http://www.mount-analogue.com/ . Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday August 4th: Science Fiction Songwriting for Teens

This is exactly why we have a public library system: real recording artists will work with Seattle-area teens (that’s age 13 and up) to write and record songs about the sci-fi story of their choice. If you record a sea shanty about Battlefield Earth, please email it to me, okay? Seattle Public Library, Southwest Branch, 9010 35th Ave SW, http://spl.org. Free, registration required. All ages. 2:30 p.m.

Saturday, August 5th: Noir at the Bar: Los Angeles vs. Seattle

The mystery-themed reading series at Seattle’s swankiest bar continues with a very special episode. Los Angeles writers including Sarah M. Chen, Ashley Erwin, Danny Gardner, and more will do literary battle with Seattle mystery writers including Kat Richardson, Tracy Weber, and Nick Feldman. The home team had better win this one. Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, http://hotelsorrento.com. Free. 21 and over. 7:30 p.m.

Sunday August 6th: Comics Dungeon Sale

Wallingford’s Comics Dungeon recently founded a nonprofit named Comics for Community, Compassion, and Culture, which teaches literacy through comics to kids. That means that if you visit Comics Dungeons’ anniversary sale and buy some $1 comics or discounted trade paperbacks, you won’t just be participating in crass commercialism — you’ll also be helping to teach local kids to read. Comics Dungeon, 319 NE 45th St., 545-8373. http://comicsdungeon.com. Free. All ages. 11 a.m.

Monday August 7th: Seattle Mystery Authors Tell All

Join local mystery authors Glen Erik Hamilton, Robert Dugoni, Tracy Weber, and Jim Ziskin as they get together to discuss the pleasures and perils of being a mystery author. This evening is scheduled as a group discussion which will then segue into a conversation with the audience — perfect for aspiring authors to get some candid tips. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday August 8th: Three Poets Reading

Melissa Dickey writes weird and wonderful poems about miniature children and accidents. Andy Stallings wrote an amazing poem about the curvature of the Earth titled “Geometry.” Jay Thompson has written poems about Dungeons & Dragons. Together, the three will either read poems or combine their bodies to form a larger Voltron-type figure, or both. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 26th - August 1st

Wednesday July 26th: Pleasure to the People

“Pleasure to the People: Stories of QTPOC Sex and Love” is a storytelling night sponsored by Gay City, Planned Parenthood, and Hugo House. An amazing cast of local writers including Anis Gisele, Imani Sims, Storme Webber, Briq House, and Chad Goller-Sojouner share their stories to start a conversation about race, queerness, and sex. Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S Massachusetts St, 518-6000. http://naamnw.org. Free. All ages. 6:30 p.m.

Thursday July 27th: Among the Living and the Dead Reading

University of Iowa creative nonfiction writer Inara Verzemnieks reads from her new family history, Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe. It’s a story of how her family traveled from Latvia to Washington state, where she was raised. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday July 28th: Rules for Walking Out Reading

See our Event of the Week Column for more details. Couth Buzzard Books, 8310 Greenwood Ave N., http://buonobuzzard.com. Donation. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 29th: Fetch Reading

Portland cartoonist Nicole Georges’ comic strip starring anthropomorphic dogs was one of the best parts of the recent Grab Back comics anthology. Tonight, she debuts a memoir about a non-anthropomorphic dog, Fetch: How a Bad Dog Brought Me Home. It’s about her attempts to save a troubled dog. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday July 30th: Freeway Park Walking Tour

Freeway Park is Seattle’s creepiest park, but it’s also kind of impressive. It was the first lid to go over a freeway in the United States. Your guides will walk you through the history of the park in a tour that will span more than five acres. Brutalism never looked so inviting. Freeway Park, http://www.atlasobscura.com/events/freeway-park-walking-tour. $15. All ages. 1 p.m.

Monday July 31st: Mapping the Impact of Racism in Seattle

Science on Tap is a monthly conversation about scientific topics. It’s been happening at the Ravenna Third Place for years, though it recently moved from the pub upstairs to the Vios Café. Tonight’s session has a very non-controversial title: "Mapping the impact of racism in Seattle: Have we moved past it?" Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Tuesday August 1st: The Tropic of Kansas Reading

Seattle author Nisi Shawl interviews Christopher Brown about his novel, which imagines a Kansas as a demilitarized zone at the center of a ruined United States of America. A brother and sister who are hiding state secrets wander through the wasteland in an attempt to get to New Orleans. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 19th - July 25th

Wednesday July 19th: TUF Zine Release Party

TUF is “a female/nonbinary/trans collective centered on electronic music and art,” and they like to make beautiful things. They’re celebrating the release of their second anthology zine with a big party in the best pizza place on Capitol Hill and a dance party at Dino’s brand-new basement music venue, with readings and visual art.
Dino’s Tomato Pie, 1524 E Olive Way, 403-1742, http://www.tuf-seattle.com. Free/$13. All ages. 6 p.m.

Thursday July 20th: Arabella and the Battle of Venus Reading

The sequel to Portland author David Levine’s swashbuckling adventure novel Arabella of Mars sails through space to the “swampy” planet of Venus. It also features a wedding, bribery, and a space war. If you’re looking for a fun summer sci-fi series to read, this is the one for you. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday July 21st: Thinks Out Loud Reading

Seattle author Martin Perlman’s debut novel is about a group of bloggers who travel the world having adventures involving shipwreck and princesses and some light time travel. The book is written in the form of the main characters’ blogs. What’s the blog equivalent of an epistolary novel? A bloggiad? University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday, July 22nd: Queer Geek Board Gaming

Capitol Hill’s biggest nerd emporium welcomes all to a free afternoon of “GLBTQ-flavored gaming and socializing.” Available games include DC superhero and Adventure Time-themed games, Relic Runners, and Small World, though you’re invited to bring your own game to share. Meet some new people in a safe and welcoming environment. Phoenix Comics & Games, 113 Broadway E, 328-4552, http://phoenixseattle.com. Free. All ages. 1 p.m.

Sunday July 23rd: Waterways Reading

Seattle is a city that has repeatedly changed its own geography, from building Pioneer Square out of mud flats to the Denny Regrade. Local historians Jennifer Ott and David B. Williams discuss their new book, which follows the history of the Lake Washington Ship Canal and examines its impact on the Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday July 24th: African-American Writers’ Alliance

The African-American Writers' Alliance (AAWA) is a Seattle-area writing collective. What this means is they put new and published authors together in forums and provide opportunities like published anthologies for members to show off their writing. Another way the AAWA honors its members is by hosting readings like this one. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday July 25th: Forget It Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 12th - July 18th

Wednesday July 12th: Kay Kenyon and Nancy Kress

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday July 13th: The Dollhouse Reading

The first novel from Fiona Davis takes place in the Barbizon Hotel for Women, a real women’s hotel in 1950’s New York. Women who moved to New York — including Sylvia Plath and Joan Didion — would stay at the Barbizon while trying to get their careers off the ground in a chauvinistic society. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday July 14th: The Atlas of Forgotten Places Reading

New-to-Seattle author Jenny D. Williams debuts her very first novel, The Atlas of Forgotten Places — about ivory smuggling and civil war in Uganda and the Congo — with a big fancy reading as only Elliott Bay can do it. Williams traveled extensively as part of the research for this book, and she has many fascinating stories to tell. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday, July 15th: Dock Street Salon

The ongoing reading partnering Greenwood bookstore Phinney Books with Ballard publisher Dock Street Press celebrates summers with three writers from Spokane. Leyna Krow brings her debut book of stories, I'm Fine, But You Appear to Be Sinking along with two poets — Tim Greenup (Without Warning) and Ben Cartwright (After Our Departure). Phinney Books, 7405 Greenwood Ave. N., 297-2665, http://phinneybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday July 16th: Making My Pitch Reading

According to press materials, Ila Borders “was the first female to win a scholarship to play men’s collegiate baseball.” She also pitched minor league baseball with men. In her spare time, she’s a firefighter in Portland. Yes, you’ve just found a new hero. She’s in town with her memoir Making My Pitch: A Woman's Baseball Odyssey. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday July 17th: Jack Straw Writers

You should always pay attention to the Jack Straw Writers. The program, in which twelve new-ish writers learn how to better communicate their ideas via readings and recordings, is often an incubator for writers who are on the verge of becoming major forces in Seattle literature. Tonight’s readers include Ellie Belew, Wancy Young Cho, Steph Kesey, Hera McLeod, and D.A. Navoti. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday July 18th: Battle Hill Bolero Reading

Every summer, the awesome Seattle writing organization Clarion West brings sci-fi writers to town for a summer reading series. The latest reading features Daniel Jose Older, whose most recent series of music-themed novels involves a battle between the living and the half-dead on the streets of New York City. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 5th - July 11th

Wednesday July 5th: Reading Through It: Dark Money

You probably know who the Koch Brothers are — those ridiculously wealthy tax-hating men who bankroll everything evil in the conservative agenda. But did you know that the Koch Brothers, as children, had a nanny who made them defecate on demand? Discuss that, and how they implemented their horrific agenda, in this month’s book club. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday July 5th: White Plains Reading

David Hicks is a Colorado writer and writing teacher whose latest book in stories, White Plains, is about post-9/11 Colorado. Hicks is joined by the best of Seattle, in the form of local writers Donna Miscolta and Andrea Dunlop. Always good to see Seattle writers help a visiting writer to launch a book into the world. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday July 6th: An Oath of Dogs Reading

The best sci-fi bookstore in town brings Portland-based Lightspeed Magazine editor Wendy N. Wagner to town to read from her sci-fi novel An Oath of Dogs, which features “eco-terrorism, sentient dogs, and corporate intrigue.” It begins with a man named Duncan getting beaten up by a man wearing cowboy boots. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday July 7th: Abloom & Awry Reading

Poet and Pulitzer Prizewinning reporter Tina Kelly, who previously lived in Seattle, returns to town to read from her latest poetry collection. She’s joined by Seattle poet Judith Skillman, who will be reading from her new book about the life of Franz Kafka and the impact left by Kafka’s horrible father. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday, July 8th: Hot Off the Press Book Fair

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday July 9th: Nature Poem Reading

Tommy Pico is a prominent Brooklyn poet, podcaster, and an editor at the terrific site Literary Hub. He’s in town with his second poetry collection, a book-length poem called Nature Poem. To help Pico celebrate his new arrival, Seattle poet Sarah Galvin — one of the very best readers in the city — will join him onstage and read a few poems. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday July 10th: My Oh My Reading

Look, I’m not a sports guy. But even a sports-hater like me has to acknowledge the greatness of Mariners sportscaster Dave Niehaus, who for years made listening to baseball on the radio actually fun. Billy Mac presents his new Niehaus biography tonight, and the crowd will undoubtedly go wild. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday July 11th: Chain Letter

The third episode of Capitol Hill’s newest reading series (created and curated by one of the long-running, much-missed Breadline reading series) features writers Joseph Raisanen, Cassandra DeKanter, and Bryan Edenfield. These three are little-known writers right now, but this is the kind of reading series that might propel them to the stratosphere. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 28th - July 4th

Wednesday June 28th: Poetic Grid

For the last two years, Claudia Castro Luna has made Seattle proud as our Civic Poet, representing Seattle’s many experiences through poetry. She’s brought poems to City Hall events, she’s published a great chapbook of poems, and she’s paired with a large number of our great arts organizations. Tonight, she debuts the Poetic Grid, a fantastic collaborative poetry map of Seattle. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday June 29th: Death Rattle Hum

Idaho nonprofit Death Rattle Writers Festival is an organization intended to bring other Northwestern writers together with Idahoan writers through contests and festivals and literary events. This reading features excellent Seattle poet Quenton Baker, reading with Idaho writers Alex Yan, Griffin Rae Birdsong, Dig Reeder, Ricky Ramirez, and Diana Forgione. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday June 30th: The Last Hurrah

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. Free. All ages. All day.

Saturday July 1st: The Fateful Fourth Reading

Washington historian Russel Holter discusses “the notorious 1900 trolley accident” that helped shape the city of Tacoma for a whole century. It’s an account of a doomed 4th of July celebration that, on our first 4th of July under President Trump, might be even more resonant than ever. University Book Store Tacoma, 1754 Pacific Ave., (253) 692-4300, http://u.bookstore.edu, 2 p.m. All ages. Free.

Sunday July 2nd: Reading with Rover

Fun fact: if you know a child who is having trouble learning how to read, have them practice reading to dogs. And if you don’t have any dogs in your life, bring them to this event, which features trained therapy dogs just waiting for kids to read to them. University Book Store Mill Creek, 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530. http://ubookstore.com. Free. All ages. 11:30 a.m.

Monday July 3rd: Works in Progress

One of Seattle’s most venerable open mic nights continues in a special pre-Independence Day edition. Bring your non-fiction or fiction or patriotic pantoum and share it with an eclectic room of regulars and newbies and aspiring writers. Press materials warn that “Some content not suitable for children or small animals.” Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday July 4th: Democracy Slam

What better way to celebrate the 4th of July than with a poetry slam? Think of today’s Democracy Slam as a celebration of your constitutional right to celebrate the freedom of speech, with booze and prizes. It’s a hell of a lot more fun than getting drunk and blowing a thumb off with some fireworks. Re-Bar, 1114 Howell St., http://rebarseattle.com. $5. 21+. 7 p.m

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 21st - 27th

Wednesday June 21st: Life After Death

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday June 22nd: Resisting Trump's Shock Doctrine

Naomi Klein reads from her latest book, No Is Not Enough, and also will talk extemporaneously about whatever special hellish thing our president decides to do this week. Who can predict what that will be? Maybe he'll give citizenship to cockroaches and declare war against Luxembourg. Why not? The Neptune, 1412 18th Ave, 1-800-745-3000. http://www.stgpresents.org/tickets/eventdetail/3522/-/resisting-trump-s-shock-doctrine-an-evening-with-naomi-klein $23.49. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Friday June 23rd: Spotlight

Group readings tend to die down around this time of year, which is a shame, because few things are better on a hot summer night than a brisk night of literary events. Tonight’s readers are Josh Potter, poet Sharon Nyree Williams, and Word Lit Zine publisher Jekeva Phillips, along with an open mic in which readers get three minutes apiece. Theater Schmeater, 2125 3rd Ave, schmee.org. $14. All ages. 7:30 p.m

Saturday June 24th: June Write-In

June Write-In This is the second in an ongoing series of write-ins in which authors gather to talk about the importance of free speech and democracy in a functioning America. Readers include afrose fatima ahmed, Catherine Bull, and Anca Szilágyi. Be prepared to write about and discuss what it is you love about your country. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

Sunday June 25th: Says You!

Did you know that Town Hall Seattle is about to close for a yearlong renovation? It’s true! One of the best readings venues in the city will be shuttered, improved, and reopened. This is your last chance to catch NPR game show Says You! in this venue for at least one year. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $32.50. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Monday June 26th: The America Syndrome Reading

Betsy Hartmann’s latest book examines how American thought tends to be overly obsessed with the apocalypse. Is the idea of the end of the world intrinsic to the American ideal? Why do Americans spend so much time thinking about Armageddon? Is there any way to turn our national psyche around? Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday June 27th: Who Belongs?

Dr. Sapna Cheryan leads a discussion about women in science, why it’s taking so long for female representation to catch up in science — particularly computer science. Also discussed: why computer science is so thick with sexist and derogatory language. How do women catch up in this traditionally male-dominated field? That’s what tonight is all about. Ada’s Technical Books, 425 15th Ave, 322-1058, http://seattletechnicalbooks.com, $5, 21+.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 14th - 20th

Wednesday June 14th: You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me Reading

Sherman Alexie is Seattle’s most entertaining reader, the most famous literary figure from Seattle, and one of our finest writers. And tonight he’s launching the biggest book of his career — a memoir about his complicated relationship with his mother. This reading is sold out, but Town Hall often has standby tickets available at the door. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://www.townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday June 15th: Writers & Poets of Washington State

Western Washington poets Gary Lilley and Ann Tweedy team up with Spokane story author Erin Pringle and Spokane novelist Sharma Shields to bridge the divide and bring eastern and western Washington together at last. For one night, let’s pretend the mountain range, desert, and broken political discourse that separates us just doesn’t exist. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://www.hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday June 16th: Wombgenda Launch Party

Over the last couple of years, Seattle Weekly contributor Tatiana Gill has become one of the city’s best and most reliable autobiographical cartoonists. Tonight, she debuts a new collection of comics specifically related to health issues, as part of the weekend-long Comics & Medicine Conference that’s visiting Seattle. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Saturday June 17th: Comics & Medicine Conference

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Various locations, http://www.graphicmedicine.org/2017-seattle-conference/.

Sunday June 18th: Thick as Thieves 2 Launch Party

The vacuum left behind by the passing of free comics newspaper Intruder was quickly filled by Thick as Thieves, a new anthology of Seattle cartoonists. Tonight, the second issue of Thick as Thieves launches with music by freaky screamy rock demigods HHRRIISSTT, a Mario Kart 64 tournament, comics art, and a big-ass raffle. Fred Wildlife Refuge, 128 Belmont Ave. E., 322-7030, http://www.hugohouse.org. Free. 21+. 7:30 p.m.

Monday June 19th: Discovering Seattle's Parks Reading

Did you know that there are 426 parks in Seattle? Linnea Westerlind has visited every single one of them, and now she’s turned her blog about visiting them all, YearofSeattleParks.com, into a fully fleshed-out book about those pockets of green which make our city so damn livable. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday June 20th: Afterparty Reading

Set in a near(-ish) future in which anyone can print drugs at home, Afterparty is about a designer drug that becomes the basis for a new religion. After the religion starts, people begin to die. Author Daryl Gregory will discuss whether or not Afterparty was inspired through pharmaceutical intervention tonight. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 7th - June 13th

Wednesday June 7th: Reading Through It: The Man Without a Face

Every month, the Seattle Weekly and the Seattle Review of Books team up to bring you a current-events book club for our Trump-possessed times. This month’s selection, unfortunately, turned out to be especially timely in this era of light treason. Join us as we discuss Masha Gessen’s The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday June 8th: The Hope of Another Spring Reading

A collection of experts celebrate the life and work of Takuichi Fujii, an artist who left Japan in 1906 to live in Seattle. His illustrated diary from the World War II internment camps have been praised as "the most remarkable document created by a Japanese American prisoner during the wartime incarceration." Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday June 9th: Mistreated Reading

Doctor Robert Pearl explains why, even though Americans believe they have the greatest health care in the world, our country has fallen to the lower half in terms of medical care in the industrialized world. Mistreated explains why and how physicians sell out to drug companies on a regular basis. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday June 10th: To Love the Coming End Reading

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Chin Music Press Showroom, Pike Place Market, 380-1947, http://chinmusicpress.com . Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday June 11th: Lily and the Octopus Reading

It’s not every Sunday that a bestselling author comes to town, but this afternoon screenwriter Steven Rowley reads from his literary phenomenon, which is about a sad man named Ted Flask who finds meaning in an octopus attached to his dog’s eye. How did this book top bestseller lists nationwide? Maybe Rowley can explain. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday June 12th: The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. Reading

Seattle novelist Neal Stephenson’s follow-up to the magisterial Seveneves is a co-authored novel with Nicole Galland. It’s about a language expert who gets wrapped up in a secret government agency over some documents which supposedly prove that magic has always existed. Set in the near-future, this one looks like it might appeal to fans of Stephenson’s lighter side. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. Free. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday June 13th: Chain Letter

Capitol Hill’s newest reading series presents its third installment with zine advocate Joseph Raisanen, non-fiction writer Cassandra DeKanter, and publisher and Babel/Salvage co-founder Bryan Edenfield. At the end of this artful reading, everyone will be invited to read in an open mic. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 31st - June 6th

Wednesday May 31st: One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter Reading

Scaachi Koul writes about culture for BuzzFeed. Her new, much-chatted-about collection of comic essays is about growing up in an Indian-Canadian family. Tonight, she’ll be in conversation with Seattle’s own Lindy West, who, as you may have heard, knows a thing or two about comedic essays. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday June 1st: Interrupting Whiteness

The whole idea of PechaKucha is that speakers simultaneously talk and show twenty slides for twenty seconds each. It’s a fun high-wire act of a public speaking spectacle. Tonight’s event is all about investigating the question of being white as it pertains to privilege, injustice, outreach, and responsibility. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday June 2nd: Volcano Reading

Neil Matheson will discuss how geography affects the way we puny humans live our lives. We celebrate when we can see Mount Rainier on sunny days, for example, but beneath that celebration, there’s also an understanding that the mountain could, in theory, kill us all at any moment. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday June 3rd: The Inheritance of Shame Reading

As a child, Peter Gajdics lived through six long years of a psychiatrist’s attempts to “convert” him from gay to straight. His memoir is about coming through so-called conversion therapy and learning how to love yourself after being exposed to so much rigorous, institutionalized hatred. (Reminder: Mike Pence still thinks conversion therapy is a good idea.) Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday June 4th: Memoir Class Dismissed

Memoirist Theo Pauline Nestor regularly teaches a yearlong memoir manuscript-writing class at Hugo House. This afternoon, her 2016–17 class will discuss what they’ve learned and share some writing they composed over the course of the class. If you’ve ever considered writing a memoir, you should check this out. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday June 5th: Upstream Reading

Northwest author Langdon Cook has written at length about mushrooms. Now he’s turning his eye to another regional staple: salmon. (Press materials call salmon “perhaps the last great wild food.”) His new book is about the history of humanity’s relationship to salmon and the environmental impact that the salmon industry has had on the land. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday June 6th: Life’s Work Reading

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $15. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 24th - May 30th

Wednesday May 24th: Displaced: Refugee Voices in Conversation

The Northwest Immigrant and Refugee Health Coalition is assembling a panel of refugees to discuss what it’s like to become a refugee in this country, and what life in America for refugees is like right now. These are conversations that everyone should hear — a reminder that Trump’s policies have real repercussions for real people. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday May 25th: Broken River Reading

J. Robert Lennon’s newest novel, Broken River, is about a husband and wife who try to find a new start in a house with a history of violence. Lennon is sharing the stage with Seattle author Elissa Washuta in her last local appearance before she takes a position at Ohio State University. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday May 26th: Lashley/Lilley

You already know that Robert Lashley is a force of nature. He’s one of the most vibrant readers to come out of the Pacific Northwest. You might not know poet Gary Copeland Lilley, a Cave Canem fellow whose latest book is The Bushman’s Medicine Show. Together, the two of them are a bicoastal poetry assassin squad. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday May 27th: Ghosts of Seattle Past at Folklife

Hard to believe that Folklife is happening already — possibly because it’s been a rainy dismal hellscape for the last six months. But we finally made it! And why not celebrate the death of dismal winter with a special group reading by contributors to Ghosts of Seattle Past, the book which celebrates lost local landmarks? Seattle Center, http://www.nwfolklife.org/festival-schedule/. Free. All ages. 1:15 p.m

Sunday May 28th: Girl on the Road Reading

Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture gives out grants to artists of all kinds. One of those grants went to local cartoonist Noel Franklin, for the completion of her memoir, Girl on the Road. This afternoon, Franklin presents a reading from the book, which is about friendship and loss and grief. She’ll also have printed samples of the book available for the audience. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Monday May 29th: Lost in Translation

Look, you’ve always wanted to read onstage, but maybe you’ve been afraid of embarrassing yourself at your favorite reading? This is your chance to participate in a once-yearly reading. Sign up 30 minutes before the reading, and participants will be selected at random. If selected, you’ll have five minutes onstage, and if you screw — you won’t — you’ll never see these people again. Go live your dream. Seattle Center, http://www.nwfolklife.org/festival-schedule/. Free. All ages. 3 p.m

Tuesday May 30th: Loud Mouth Lit

See our Event of the Week column for more details. St. Andrews Bar & Grill, 7406 Aurora Ave N., 523-1193, http://standrewsbarandgrill.com/. Free. All ages. 8 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 17th - May 23rd

Wednesday May 17th: SAL Presents: The Moth

The Moth has become a preeminent name in storytelling, and Seattle Arts and Lectures brings some of the best storytellers to town. Regular Moth host Dan Kennedy presents musician Andy Fischer-Price, veteran and state department employee Laurence Kerr, artist Jessica Lee Williamson, and Seattle’s own Ijeoma Oluo, who is quickly (and rightfully) achieving national prominence. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, https://www.lectures.org. $35. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday May 18th: Everfair Exhibit Opening

Sci-fi novelist Nisi Shawl’s Everfair was one of the best books to be published by a Seattle author last year. Tonight, it inspires a whole new generation of Seattle art. Push/Pull gallery presents new work by Seattle artists inspired by Shawl’s steampunk alternate history of the Congo. Shawl will be in attendance. Push/Pull, 5484 Shilshole Ave N.W., 789-1710, http://pushpullseattle.weebly.com/. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday May 19th: Jack Straw Writing Fellows

Every year, a curator chooses a group of Seattle writers to learn how to do a better job of reading their work, both live and in audio recordings. This year a handful of authors selected by Jourdan Imani Keith will present their latest work and show off what they’ve learned. Readers tonight include Ellie Belew, Hera McLeod, Ashlan Runyan, and the fabulous Quenton Baker. Jack Straw Gallery, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., 634-0919, http://jackstraw.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday May 20th: Mancini/Nufer

Vancouver poet Donato Mancini is reading twice in Seattle to celebrate his new book, Same Diff. He’ll be joined by irrepressible Seattle poet Doug Nufer, who will soon be releasing a new poetry collection of his own, titled The Me Theme. Why not spend your afternoon with two very fine Cascadian poets? Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Sunday May 21st: Apollo 8 Reading

Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon is about a horrendous year in American history (almost exactly 50 years ago now) when we decided to send human beings to the goddamned moon. Maybe the problem with this horrendous year in American history is we’re not shooting enough people into space. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday May 22nd: SCALE Reading

Now more than ever in these Trumpy times, it’s important to give scientists your attention. Tonight, according to press materials, a theoretical physicist named Geoffrey West “explores the hidden laws that govern the lifecycle of everything from plants and animals to our cities in his new book.” Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday May 23rd: King County Libraries Fundraiser

Spokane author Jess Walter is one of the most charming and funny authors you’ll ever see in person. Tonight, he’ll share the stage with Lark chef John Sundstrom for a fancy meal and a conversation moderated by yours truly as a fundraiser for King County Libraries. It’s for a great cause, and it will be great fun. Lark, 952 E. Seneca St., 323-5275, http://kclsfoundation.org. $200. All ages. 6 p.m.

Alternate Tuesday May 23rd: The Biographies of Ordinary People Reading

Since the Seattle Review of Books is affiliated with the previous event (and since it’s a very expensive fundraiser), allow me to suggest an alternate reading. Seattle author Nicole Dieker, whose excellent writing you can find almost every day at The Billfold, debuts her first novel at this launch party. Dieker has been very open about the process of self-publishing the book, and anyone looking to learn how to get their writing out there should be paying attention. Phinney Books, 7405 Greenwood Ave. N., 297-2665, http://phinneybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 10th to May 16th

Wednesday May 10th: Sacred Breath Reading Series

The UW's Department of American Indian Studies presents three indigenous writers as part of a quarterly reading series. The readers are poet Cedar Sigo, poet Trevino L. Brings Plenty, and Seattle memoirist Elissa Washuta, who recently announced she’s leaving town for a teaching opportunity. UW Intellectual House, 4249 Whitman Ct, 634-3400, http://ubookstores.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday May 11th: Borough Body

Tennessee painter Douglas Degges teams up with Seattle writer Chelsea Werner-Jatzke to create two maps of the New York City subway system: one told visually and one told with words. Maybe one day, Seattle’s subway system will be large and complicated enough to inspire works of art like this. The Factory, 1216 10th Ave, http://thefactoryseattle.com . Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday May 12th: Love and Trouble Reading

Bainbridge memoirist Claire Dederer debuts her much-anticipated new book. Subtitled A Midlife Reckoning, Love and Trouble is about what happens when Dederer finds herself in an unexpected state of sexual reawakening. The book juxtaposes Dederer’s youth and her midlife into a single narrative, tied together through eroticism. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday May 13th: Eartha Reading

Fantagraphics cartoonist Cathy Malkasian’s latest book, Eartha, is a splendidly illustrated graphic novel about a brave young woman in a strange world where people read news printed on biscuits and then very publicly cry. It’s about the internet. Here's my interview with her, which we published on Monday. At this event, Malkasian will appear in conversation with Fantagraphics co-founder Gary Groth, who knows a thing or two about interviewing. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Monday May 15th: Keller Family Lecture with Jeffrey Toobin

This year’s annual Keller Family Lecture is delivered by Jeffrey Toobin, who is the New Yorker’s Supreme Court expert, which makes him one of the world’s leading Supreme Court experts. But Toobin has also written books about the Obama administration and, most recently, Patty Hearst. So it’s anyone’s guess as to what this talk will be about Temple De Hirsch Sinai, 1511 E. Pike St. 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday May 16th: Joan Swift Memorial Reading and Celebration

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 3rd - May 9th

Wednesday May 3rd: Reading Through It: The Righteous Mind

I hope you’ll join us for our book club examining the causes and effects of Donald Trump’s presidency. It’s been a total delight so far, full of brainy, passionate discussion. Tonight, we’ll discuss The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion. No purchase necessary; just come ready to talk and listen. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday May 3rd: Priestdaddy Reading

Since the Seattle Review of Books is a co-sponsor of the book club, allow us to suggest another event so you don’t accuse us of favoritism. Poet Patricia Lockwood reads from her delightful memoir Priestdaddy tonight, and it's a big damn deal. As I said in my review, the prose is gorgeous and the story will leave you laughing and crying — sometimes both at the same time. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday May 4th: Unwarranted Reading

In his new book, Barry Friedman, a law professor at New York University, examines the crisis in modern policing. Why do cops now dress like they’re SEAL Team 6 and drive around in tanks? How did the balance of power between police and the people they’re sworn to protect get so…well…unbalanced? UW Law School, Room 133, 634-3400, http://ubookstore.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday May 5th: Writers on Writers Release Party

The editors behind Seattle’s own PageBoy Magazine debuts their brand-new book, an anthology of writing about writers. Local writers Sarah Koenig, Jeanine Walker, Amber Nelson, and Paul Nelson will read their writer-centric pieces in what should be a fun celebration of the art of putting words on paper in some sort of order.

Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, vermillionseattle.com. Free. 21+. 7 p.m.

Saturday May 6th: Free Comic Book Day

Every comic shop in the region will be giving away free comics all day today (while supplies last.) Your friendly neighborhood comics shop will likely be celebrating with sales, appearances by local comics creators, and more. If you haven’t yet been, this is also a great opportunity to visit Fremont’s Outsider Comics & Geek Boutique, Seattle’s newest comic shop. Various locations, https://www.freecomicbookday.com. Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

Sunday May 7th: Lines of Flight Reading

Julie Salverson’s book, subtitled An Atomic Memoir, is about a group of indigenous peoples in Ontario who sent a delegation to Japan to apologize for their complicity in war. Seems the uranium to build the first two American atomic bombs was mined from their land, and they felt honor-bound to go make amends.
Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday May 8th: Mozart’s Starling Reading

This is a bizarre story: one day when Mozart was out shopping, he came across a little starling who was singing one of his concertos. He took the bird on as a pet and then kinda collaborated with it for the next three years. Birdwatcher Lyanda Lynn Haupt will discuss her belief that starlings are seriously underrated creatures. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday May 9th: Seattle Reads The Turner House

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Ballard Library, 5614, 22nd Ave NW. 684-4089. spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 26th - May 2nd

Wednesday April 26th: Edible City Reading

Edible City is an art book designed as a showcase for the MOHAI exhibit of the same name. It profiles the food-based traditions of the Pacific Northwest with photographs, recipes, and stories about Pike Place Market, Rainier cherries, and more. Exhibit curator Rebekah Denn will host the reading and discussion. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m

Thursday April 27th: Void Star Reading

Novelist Zachary Mason is also a computer scientist who specializes in artificial intelligence. So while he works in a field that will eventually destroy all of humanity — Terminator 2 was a documentary, people! — he explores the idea of what it means to be human in his new novel, Void Star. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday April 28th: New Beginnings

Anastacia-Renee Tolbert, the current Hugo House poet-in-residence, headlines a reading exploring the ideas of “new beginnings, non-gender conformity, ‘safety,’ and womanism,” Readers include Hawaiian fiction writer Kristiana Kahakauwila, poet Lauren K. Alleyne, and Seattle poetry phenomenon Jamaica Baldwin, who burst onto the scene a year ago and has been wowing audiences ever since. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. $10. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday April 29th: Seattle Bookstore Day

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Various locations, https://www.facebook.com/SEABookstoreDay/. Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

Sunday April 30th: 2017 Grand Slam

Did you know that Seattle is home to a lively open mic scene? It’s true. The viral poet behind “Revenge,” Elisa Chavez, is just one of the incredible talents to burst out of this scene in recent years. Tonight, the greatest readers at Seattle Poetry Slam compete for the right to represent Seattle at the 2017 National Poetry Slam in Denver. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $15. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Monday May 1st: Last Day on Mars Reading

Prolific Seattle novelist Kevin Emerson’s latest book Last Day on Mars is a sci-fi novel about a young human who must struggle to survive when humanity flees the destruction of Mars. Tonight, Emerson will give an all-ages lecture on the latest scientific understanding of Mars. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday May 2nd: Two Paths: America Divided or United Reading

Okay, look: Ohio Goveror John Kasich is a Republican. And he’s not one of those mythical cuddly Republicans: he’s anti-abortion and he’s very weak on income inequality. But! He’s one of the few Republicans with the guts to refute Trump to his face. So maybe come figure out if common ground is a possibility? Theatre at Meydenbauer Center,11100 NE 6th St., Bellevue. (206) 366-3333, http://www.thirdplacebooks.com/. $36. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 19th - April 25th

Wednesday April 19th: The Book of Joan Reading

Portland novelist Lidia Yuknavitch is a Northwest superstar. Her prickly, gorgeous fiction is at recognizable and more than a little bit scary. (It’s scary in part because it is so recognizable.) Yuknavitch’s latest, The Book of Joan, is a sci-fi novel that retells the story of Joan of Arc in a blasted-out dystopic wasteland. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday April 20th: Dock Street Salon

Phinney Books’s Dock Street Salon series is always a fun time. Authors talk in a fairly up close and intimate setting with an engaged and excited audience. Today’s readers are Anne Liu Kellor, Jennifer D. Munro, and Ann Teplick. Expect a reading, a lively Q&A, and maybe some booze (not in that order.) Phinney Books, 7405 Greenwood Ave. N., 297-2665, http://phinneybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday April 21st: The Histories Reading

A few local writers have told me that Seattle poet Jason Whitmarsh’s second book, The Histories, is their favorite poetry collection this year. It’s a book of absurdist, deeply funny prose poems that constructs an alternate history for the world, with singing Kafkas and MacGyver references galore. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday April 22nd: Water & Salt Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday April 23rd: Caucasians Anonymous Reading

You might know Marcus Harrison Green best for his excellent news site, the South Seattle Emerald. But tonight, he’s showing off a new side: he’s debuting a reading of his work-in progress play titled Caucasians Anonymous, which investigates “the social construction known as Whiteness.” This event also features a Q&A on race and privilege. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Monday April 24th: Breaking the Bond Reading

The very fine Texas playwright Rupert Reyes brings a staged reading from his latest work-in-progress play, Breaking the Bond, to the U District’s own Jack Straw Gallery. Featuring local Spanish-speaking readers, this play discusses topics of deportation, anchor babies, and national identity. (Reyes has also acted in the film Office Space.) Jack Straw Gallery, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., 634-0919, http://jackstraw.org . Free. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday April 25th: Till Tonight

New local writing residency Till brings a little bit of a writing residency to you with this special writers’ night out. Show up with your favored writing implement (although please recall that typewriters are really annoying in public places) and share some space with other people trying to get words down on paper. Speckled & Drake, 1355 E. Olive Way., (917) 476-932, http://tillwriters.org/. Free. 21+. 6 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 12th - April 18th

Wednesday April 12th: Krazy Reading

George Herriman was America’s very first cartooning genius. His strip Krazy Kat depicted more than just a love triangle between a cat, a brick-throwing mouse, and a canine police officer — it laid out the cartooning language that we still see in modern comics. Michael Tisserand’s biography of Herriman finally gives the genius his due. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday April 13th: White Tears Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday April 14th: Panel Jumper Live

This is basically an entire horny comicon crowbarred into a single evening. You’ll find comics-themed music, trivia, and short films. But that’s not all: there’s also a short play about the actors who play giant monsters in movies, a conversation with Seattle cartoonist Tatiana Gill, and some nerdy burlesque involving Tribbles. West of Lenin, 203 N 36th St., https://www.facebook.com/thepaneljumper/. $10. 18+. 8 p.m.

Saturday April 15th: Write Our Democracy

Seattle poets Quenton Baker, Karen Finneyfrock, EJ Koh, and Natasha Moni read at this write-in intended to promote “free speech and the value of arts in our democracy.” Write Our Democracy is the organization that was launched waaaaaaaay back in January of this year as Writers Resist, a nationwide anti-Trump, pro-democracy writing group. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org.. Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

Monday April 17th: Moving Mountains

Local newsletter The Evergrey brought 20 Clinton voters from Seattle to a pro-Trump county in Oregon in order to facilitate conversation between decent human beings. Tonight, Evergrey founders Anika Anand and Monica Guzman will discuss what they learned from the project, along with the heads of other organizations trying to promote discussion in a divided America Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday April 18th: Word Works: Terence Hayes

Brilliant poet Terence Hayes examines the work of deceased poet Lynda Hull by studying three of her poems written over the span of a decade, in an effort to explore “how a poet can both accept and challenge his or her obsessions.” What a terrific way to celebrate National Poetry Month. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, http://washingtonhall.org. $12. All ages. 7 p.m

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 5th - April 11th

Wednesday April 5th: Reading Through It: What We Do Now

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday April 6th: American Junkie Reading

Tom Hansen’s grunge-era Seattle memoir American Junkie is finally being reissued. It’s a story about drugs and punk rock and a city on the precipice of something bigger. To celebrate his book’s second chance on life, Hansen’s being joined by Seattle authors Sean Beaudoin and Joshua Mohr for a group reading and a moderated discussion. Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m

Friday April 7th: Hugo Literary Series: Betrayal

The Hugo House brings three writers and a musician together to produce new work on a theme. The final event of the 2016-2017 season is “Betrayal.” Readers include poet Anis Mojgani, celebrated slam poet Kaitlyn Greenidge, and poet Rick Barot, along with musician Maiah Manser. Fred Wildlife Refuge, 128 Belmont Ave. E., 322-7030. http://www.hugohouse.org. $10-25. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday April 8th: The Songs of Trees Reading

So it turns out that trees are a lot weirder than we ever guessed. They communicate using bizarre fungus webs and they cultivate “bacterial communities” that serve all kinds of functions that we’re only just now learning about. In his newest book, David Haskell discusses the cutting edge of tree research, which should probably be known as “treesearch.” Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Sunday April 9th: Truth Be Bold Reading

Julene Tripp Weaver is a Seattle poet who worked in AIDS services for over two decades. Subtitled Serenading Life & Death in the Age of AIDS, her latest collection continues the themes of her work. This afternoon, she debuts her book with nine local poets and AIDS educators in a reading hosted by local writer David Schmader. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 4 p.m.

Monday April 10th: Ask the Oracle

Suzanne Morrison joins Seattle experimental writer Doug Nufer and prolific Seattle poet Megan Snyder-Camp as part of Hugo House’s divination-based reading series. Authors will answer audience questions using answers pulled from their texts. All three writers are great, but Nufer in particular could be a standout; he does lots of performance-based routines and should be especially devoted to the schtick. Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, http://hotelsorrento.com. Free. 21 and over. 7 p.m

Tuesday April 11th: Ghosts of Seattle Past Reading

The long-awaited atlas of lost Seattle places debuts with a reading featuring Hollis Wong-Wear, Sara Brickman, Chuck Wolfe, Anisa Jackson, and Davey Oil. After this reading/signing session, the whole party rolls downhill to Belltown for a big afterparty at the Rendezvous with more readings from Kibibi Monie, Elissa Washuta, Kathy Fennessy, and Kate Lebo. There'll also be a musical performance from Aaron Seme. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.