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Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 12th - November 18th

Monday, November 12: Evolution Reading

Eileen Myles is one of the mightiest writers in America today. Their new collection of poetry, Evolution is about America and the presidency and corporate consumer culture. This might just be the poetry collection that 2018 needs. Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, November 13: SFWA Reading

The Science Fiction Writers of America celebrates its Northwest chapter with readings from two local sci-fi greats: Sandra Odell and Mary Robinette Kowal. Kirkland doesn't see very many readings, so it's good to see the SFWA representing on the east side. Wilde Rover Irish Pub & Restaurant, 111 Central Way, Kirkland, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free, 21+.

Wednesday, November 14: Fierce Reading

Jo Weldon is Headmistress at the New York School of Burlesque. Her new book Fierce is subtitled The History of Leopard Print. It's about the daringest print that looks great on everyone, and how it quietly took over the fashion world. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, November 15: The Food and Drink of Seattle Reading

Judith Dern's new book digs into the history of Seattle's food, from mushrooms to salmon. All the usual favorites, from geoducks to craft beers, are represented in the book. Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, November 16: Catch, Release Reading

Port Townsend writer Adrienne Harun celebrates her recently published second collection of short fiction tonight. It's about thefts and cults and con games and violations of trust.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, November 17: The Sexiest Man Alive Book Launch

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, https://www.facebook.com/events/299333797329025/, 7 pm, $5.

Sunday, November 18: Seattle Anarchist Bookfair

Come check out tables from vendors including Ad Astra Comix, Rose City Antifa, Left Bank Books, Tech Workers Coalition, Detritus Books, and Blood Fruit Library at the annual Anarchist Bookfair. Workshops include a report of recent IWW actions and a discussion of racism.

Vera Project, 305 Harrison St, 956-8372, http://seattleanarchistbookfair.net, 10 am, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 5th - 11th

Monday, November 5: The Best Bad Things Reading

Seattle author Katrina Carrasco debuts her new novel, The Best Bad Things, with conversational help from beloved Seatle writer Nicola Griffith. The Best Bad Things is crime fiction about a woman who is a "detective, smuggler, [and] spy" in the year of our lord 1887.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, November 6: Ellen Forney

Look, first of all, please vote. And then after you vote, you can treat yourself with a reading by one of Seattle's very finest cartoonists, Ellen Forney. Her fabulous book Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me was selected as this year’s UW Health Sciences Common Book. Hogness Auditorium, UW Campus, https://www.facebook.com/uwhscommonbook/ 5:30 pm, free.

Wednesday November 7: The Library Book Reading

Susan Orlean is one of the best non-fiction authors in the country. Her latest, a history and examination of libraries, is the textbook definition of a balm for troubled times. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, November 8: Seattleness Reading

Here's a fun one for locals: Seattleness is a collection of charts, graphs, and maps celebrating all things Seattle. Both data visualization nerds and map nerds will find plenty to geek out over in this one, and you're guaranteed to learn something new about Seattle every few pages. Rainier Arts Center, 3515 S Alaska St, 725-7517, http://www.rainierartscenter.org/, 7:30 pm, $5.

Friday, November 9: Diving Into the Wreck

It's time for the Hugo House's reading series, which offers three writers and a musician an opportunity to create new work on a theme. The readers tonight are Lauren Groff, R. O. Kwon, and Kim Fu (whose The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore was one of the books I loved most last year.) They'll be joined by Seattle musician Shelby Earl, and the theme is "Diving into the Wreck," which is not the best Hugo House theme, but I'm sure these artists will do something great with it. Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7:30 pm, $25.

Saturday, November 10: Shout Your Abortion Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, November 11: Subjective Geography Reading

Seattle poet Madeline DeFrees was interested in place and how it affects interior life. This celebration is a debut party to launch a new collection of essays by DeFrees, many of which are about that very subject. At this reading, the book's editor, Anne McDuffie, will be joined by Laura Jensen, Sharon Bryan, and Jennifer Maier. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 5 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from October 29th - November 4th

Monday, October 29: People Like Us Reading

Sayu Bhojwani is a political scientist whose book People Like Us is subtitled The New Wave of Candidates Knocking at Democracy’s Door. Tonight, she'll be interviewed by UW poli-sci professor Sophia Jordán Wallace about candidates of color and women candidates who are breaking the stranglehold that white men have on American politics. Rainier Arts Center, 3515 S. Alaska St, 652-4255. http://townhallseattle.org, 6 pm, $5.

Tuesday, October 30: Dungeons and Dragons Art and Arcana Reading

This is a reading for a big and beautiful art book that serves as a visual history of Dungeons and Dragons. There's artwork and photographs and rarities and all sorts of D&D history crammed between the covers, which the publisher refers to as "the most comprehensive collection of D&D imagery ever assembled."

University Lutheran Church, 1604 NE 50th St, https://townhallseattle.org, 7:30 pm, $5.

Wednesday, October 31: The Meaning of Blood Reading

Chuck Caruso's murder-and-sex-packed collection of short stories veers from crime to westerns to horror and back again. This is a great way to spend a Halloween if you don't want to dodge kids in costumes or chronically drunk college students on the streets of the city. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 6 pm, free.

Thursday, November 1: Instruments of the True Measure Reading

Phenomenal Seattle poet Laura Da' debuts her latest collection of poetry, with the help of local poets Sasha LaPointe and Casandra López. Instruments of the True Measure is about identity and what it means to be from a place and maps. We'll be hearing a lot more from and about Da' here on the Seattle Review of Books as the month goes on. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, November 2: The Lachrymose Report

Sierra Nelson's debut collection of poems, the debut title from Poetry Northwest's new publishing arm, has been described by many (including me) as "long-awaited" for so long that it's hard to believe it's finally here. Nelson, a beloved Seattle poet, has somehow never published a full-length book before, so this is a very special night. Nii Modo Art Gallery, 4453 Stone Way North, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, November 3: Short Run Comix and Arts Festival

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Center, http://shortrun.org/, 11am to 6 pm, free.

Sunday, November 4: Vicinity/Memoryall Reading

The former owners of Open Books, Christine Deavel and John Marshall, read from a new play they've been working on. The play is about two people trying to find a memorial. This reading will also be accompanied by a short film. Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from Oct 22nd - Oct 28th

Monday, October 22: Half-Breed Reading

Half-Breed is a reading and musical performance by PC Muñoz, who will at this show be releasing his album Physical Science, which has a companion chapbook titled Inside Pocket of a Houndstooth Blazer. Here is a trailer for the event:

Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, $10.

Tuesday, October 23: Bridge of Clay Reading

The author of runaway bestseller The Book Thief returns to Seattle with his first book since Thief — a novel about five brothers who scour the world looking for the truth behind their enigmatic father. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, October 24: Entre Ríos Books Anniversary Reading

The local poetry publisher celebrates three years in the cut-throat publishing business with some short films and a great lineup including...

...Rachel Kessler, Melinda Mueller, Maya Jewell Zeller, and E. Briskin. Hear new translation work by Deborah Woodard and play excerpts from Christine Deavel and J.W. Marshall.

Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, October 25: Two Readings in South Seattle

See our event of the week column for more details.

Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free. Type Set, 3827C S Edmunds St, https://www.typesetseattle.com/, 7 pm, free.

Friday, October 26: Courageous Pursuits

Four new authors — Cathy Zane, Lisa Reddick, Donna Cameron, and Barbara Stark-Nemon — talk about their new books: Better Than This, The Same River, A Year of Living Kindly, and Hard Cider, respectively. Secret Garden Books, 2214 NW Market St., 789-5006, http://secretgardenbooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, October 27: Contemporary Fairy Tales

One of Seattle's finest authors, Anca Szilagyi, teaches you how to write your own fairy tale in this free class at Seattle Public Library. Szilagyi's debut novel uses fairy tale imagery to tell a story that feels pointed and new. Maybe this is how that novel, Daughters of the Air, got its start! helps you write your own fairy tale *Seattle Public Library, Queen Anne Branch, 400 W Garfield St, http://spl.org, 2 pm, free.

Sunday, October 28: Invasions Reading

Michelle Tea says of Seattle author Calvin Gimpelevich's collection of short stories, "Invasions blew my mind. Flipping between speculative worlds deeply rooted in realness and emotion and more familiar landscapes that tip on the edges of personal apocalypses, Gimpelevich's writing is strong and sure, taking us places we really haven't been. I'm hooked." Gimpelevich has connections to local arts organizations Artist Trust, Jack Straw Cultural Center, and 4Culture, so this book debut party is a real hometown celebration.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from October 15th - October 21st

Monday, October 15: Not Heaven, Somewhere Else Reading

I've already told you why you should read Rebecca Brown’s new collection, Not Heaven, Somewhere Else: A Cycle of Stories. But if you're still not convinced, you should attend this reading, and hear the work in the author's own words. Find out why I am 100 percent positive that Brown is the smartest writer in Seattle — and also find out why she's often the most joyful reader in town on any given night. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, October 16: Ted Chiang and Karen Joy Fowler in Conversation

Everyone should know that Ted Chiang, author of the story that was the basis for the excellent film Arrival, is from the Seattle area. he's one of the best-loved writers within the sci-fi community, and for a great reason: he's smart, he's kind, and he loves to be generous with his knowledge. Tonight, Chiang will be in conversation with nationally loved sci-fi writer Karen Joy Fowler. This should be a sci-fi conversation for the ages. Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, $10.

Wednesday, October 17: WordsWest 38

West Seattle's best reading series continues tonight with a reading along the theme "Girls & Daughters." The readers are a coupling that never occurred to me before, but which makes perfect sense: Stacey Levine and Anca Szilágyi. Levine has been writing and reading in Seattle since the 1990s — she had a single on Sub Pop back in the day — and Szilágyi's work has a fair amount of Levine's DNA in it. This is a fascinating duet. C&P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave SW, http://wordswestliterary.weebly.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, October 18: Walter Mosley

Walter Mosley is an iconic author — one of the few writers left who draw a massive audience on the strength of his name alone. (And he always dresses like a star for his readings.) His latest book, John Woman, is about a man with a mysterious past. Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S Massachusetts St, 518-6000. http://naamnw.org, 7 pm, free.

Friday, October 19: What We Do with the Wreckage Reading

Local author Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum, who contributed to the excellent This Is the Place anthology, reads from her new award-winning short story collection, What We Do with the Wreckage. It's about rising above the horrors of the past. *Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 6 pm, free.

Saturday, October 20: New England Review Anniversary Reading

Okay, obviously the Seattle Review of Books isn't ordinarily the place to celebrate the 40th anniversary of a magazine titled the New England Review, but get a load of the authors who'll be coming to this event: Keetje Kuipers, Eric McMillan, Susan Rich, Rick Barot, Gabrielle Bates, Martha Silano, and Lena Khalaf Tuffaha. We can set aside our famous feud against New England for one afternoon for this lineup. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, October 21: Killing Marías Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Rainier Arts Center, 3515 S Alaska St, 725-7517, http://www.rainierartscenter.org/, 2 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from October 8th - October 14th

Monday, October 8: Everyday People Reading

Jennifer Baker is the editor of a short story anthology titled Everyday People: The Color of Life. Tonight, she's presenting the book with Seattle contributors including Anastacia-Renee, Dennis Norris II, and Jessica Rycheal. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, October 9: Four Poets

We are big fans of Seattle poet E.J. Koh. Tonight, she reads with three other poets including Keegan Lester, Carly Jo Miller, and the delightful Jane Wong. Think of this as your Lit Crawl pre-funk. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, October 10: A Year of Living Kindly Reading

Look: try to be kind, okay? Donna Cameron's new book is about changing the world through small acts of kindness. I know this feels like lunacy in a world with egregious acts of unkindness happening all around us at all times, but maybe that's exactly why it's important to think about kindness right now. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, October 11: Lit Crawl

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Everywhere. 6 pm - late.

Friday, October 12: Terrible blooms reading

San Francisco writer Melissa Stein's latest poetry collection, Terrible blooms, was published by Port Townsend's own Copper Canyon Press. Stein is joined tonight by wondrous Seattle poet Sarah Galvin. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, October 13: Pistil Books 25th Anniversary

Pistil Books was a brick-and-mortar bookstore in the Pike/Pine neighborhood (roughly where Bimbo's is today.) They still have a flourishing online bookstore, and they've officially been in business for 25 years, which is a big deal. Tonight, they're celebrating with cake and with readings by Capitol Hill authors Rebecca Brown and Stacey Levine. This will be a good evening for nostalgia and for looking forward. Pistil Books, secret location, please RSVP to pistil@speakeasy.net.

Sunday, October 14: First Mountain Reading

Did you know that a world-class, expert translator of Chinese poetry lives and works in Olympia? Her name is Zhang Er, and her latest book of poetry is titled First Mountain. It was written in Chinese and translated by Zhang Er herself and Joseph Donahue. This afternoon, she reads with Leonard Schwartz, author of Salamander: A Bestiary.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from October 1st - 7th

Monday, October 1: Uncompromising Honor Reading

The best sci-fi bookstore in town brings David Weber to Seattle. Weber's latest Honor Harrington adventure has been in the making for five years, and UBS customers get to read it one full day before everyone else. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, October 2: Bookish Trivia

All this month, the library is hosting Booktoberfest events around town at bars and other nontraditional venues. Tonight is a bookish trivia night (maximum team size is eight people) and if you're thinking of going alone, don't fear: they'll help match you with other book-lovers. This is a great way to meet people with similar interests. Naked City Brewery, 8564 Greenwood Ave N, 838-6299, http://www.nakedcitybrewing.com/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, October 3: Word Works: Sarah Manguso

You probably know Manguso from last year's 300 Arguments, an autobiographical inquiry into what it means to be human in this time. It was one of the most exciting books to be published over the last few years. Tonight, Manguso will give a craft talk about authority at the new Hugo House.

Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, $15.

Thursday, October 4: Lit Crawl Fundraiser and Kickoff

Last week, I interviewed Lit Crawl's managing director, Jekeva Phillips, and Lit Crawl programmer Anastacia-Renée about why Lit Crawl is so fun and still somehow free. Phillips had this to say:

A big reason why it’s free is because of our fundraiser on October 4th. We have fun things we’re going to be auctioning off — items with different price ranges. We’ll have things on the cheaper side that are better for our writer and artist friends, but we’ll also have items like a voiceover class and different works of art.

We wanted to bring some fun stuff to the Lit Crawl fundraiser kickoff party this year, which is why we asked Briq House. She’s a body-positive burlesque performer, and she’ll be doing a literary/Halloween-themed burlesque dance. We love books, but we also love to party.

What more do you need to know? Get out to this event, get excited for next week's Lit Crawl, and help keep the celebration free.

Capitol Cider, 818 E. Pike St., 397-3564, 7 pm, $5, 21+.

Friday, October 5: Denise Levertov Award

For this 15th annual award celebrating the life and work of Denise Levertov, poet and activist Carolyn Forché will be celebrated for her work with poetry and religion and faith. There will be an award ceremony, a talk, and a reception with wine and food.

Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7:30 pm, free.

Saturday, October 6: The Slow Art Book Launch Party and Gramma Reading Series #2

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Artspace Hiawatha Lofts, 843 Hiawatha Pl S, Seattle, 709-7611, http://www.artspacehiawatha.com, 5 pm, free.

Erickson Theater, 1524 Harvard Ave, https://gramma.press/, 7 pm, $12.

Sunday, October 7: COAST | NoCOAST Reading

COAST | NoCOAST, an experimental literary magazine formerly known as Northside Review, has staff in Ohio and Seattle. Today, the Seattle office is celebrating a brand new issue with a group reading at the best damn poetry bookstore in the United States. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 5 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 24th - September 30th

Monday, September 24: Teaching for Black Lives Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave S. https://www.langstonseattle.org/, 7 pm, $5.

Tuesday, September 25: Chain Letter

The most continuity-obsessed reading series in Seattle continues tonight with poet Willie James, multi-hyphenate writer and open mic host Kate Berwanger, and poet Morris Stegosaurus. The reading will be followed by an open mic. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, September 26: The Dead Reading

BookForum describes Swiss novelist Christian Kracht's The Dead as "like a reboot of J. G. Ballard’s Crash, in a treatment by Wes Anderson, after a weekend spent binge-watching John Schlesinger’s version of The Day of the Locust." That's, uh, a lot of comparisons.
Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, September 27: South Asian Writers of the Pacific Northwest

Help the Hugo House celebrate its first week in operation since moving back home with a passel of local authors including Jordan Alam, Sasha Duttchoudhury, Jasleena Grewal, Shankar Narayan, and your host Sonora Jha. Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, free.

Friday, September 28: Brave New World

The first Hugo Literary Series event in the House's new space happens tonight. If it's been so long that you've forgotten the deal: three writers (including at least one nationally known author) and one musician compose new work on a theme. Tonight's theme is "Brave New World" and the artists are writers Jim Shepard, Cedar Sigo, Sabina Murray, and musician Anhayla. Hugo House, 1634 11th Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org, 7:30 pm, $25.

Saturday, September 29: The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein Reading

It's almost October, which means it's time for creepy stories. This afternoon, Kiersten White reads from her novel that expands on the perspective of a young woman in the Frankenstein story. The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein is in some ways a reconsideration of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's legacy. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 5 pm, free.

Sunday, September 30: Dreamers Reading

Children's book author Yuyi Morales brings her new picture book memoir to town. It's a story about how she moved to the United States from Mexico in 1994 with nothing but some dreams and a baby in her arms. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 17th - September 23rd

Monday, September 17: Washington Black Reading

Canadian author Esi Edugyan's unlikely novel about slavery and adventure was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Tonight, Seattle audiences get to hear the book in the author's own words. She doesn't make it out this way often, so go see her now. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, September 18: Sikh Captain America

You've probably seen Vishavjit Singh in Seattle media over the last few months. Signh, who dresses in a modified Captain America costume, uses cartoons and comics to fight racism and intolerance. His exhibit "WHAM! BAM! POW! Cartoons, Turbans & Confronting Hate" is currently on exhibit at the Wing Luke Museum. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 6 pm, free.

Wednesday, September 19: WordsWest Literary Series

Seattle fiction writer Greg November possesses the kind of resume that authors used to have: he worked as a "house painter, truck driver, forklift driver, knife salesman, generator salesman, executive assistant to the general manager of a luxury hotel in Santa Barbara, and fulfillment coordinator in a chemical history museum." He'll be joined by poet Joannie Strangeland for this installment of West Seattle's best reading series. C&P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave SW, http://wordswestliterary.weebly.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, September 20: A Heart In a Body in the World Reading

Seattle author Deb Caletti's new novel is about a young woman who runs from Seattle to the other Washington — Washington DC. The book is about grief and overcoming pain and trauma. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Friday, September 21: The Sarrocco Siblings

Former Seattle author Nicole Sarrocco is the author of a great poetry collection titled Karate Bride. She is now two volumes into a memoir. The first memoir is titled Lit By Lightning and the second is titled Ill-Mannered Ghosts. Tonight, she's joined by her brother, who frequently reads in Seattle. Arundel Books, 212 1st Ave S, https://www.arundelbooks.com/, 6 pm, free.

Saturday, September 22: Hugo House Grand Re-Opening

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Hugo House, 1634 Eleventh Avenue, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7 pm, free.

Sunday, September 23: Kindred Comic Reading

It takes a lot of guts to adapt one of Octavia Butler's most beloved novels into comic form. Tonight, artist John Jennings and writer Damian Duffy will read from their adaptation of Kindred, which has been reviewed surprisingly well. If you've ever wondered how comics artists adapt literature into comics, this is your best opportunity to ask someone who's done it. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 10th - September 16th

Monday, September 10: The Mere Wife Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, September 11: Birds, Bees, and #MeToo

Seattle Review of Books contributor Bonnie J. Rough, who recently published a new book titled Beyond Birds & Bees: Bringing Home a New Message About Sex, Love, and Equality, will lead a discussion about raising children in a time of massive gender inequality and the #MeToo movement. She'll be joined by Amy Lang and Seattle Times columnist Nicole Brodeur. Phinney Center Community Hall, 6532 Phinney Ave N, 783-2244, http://www.phinneycenter.org, 7:30 pm, $5.

Wednesday September 12: Fight Like a Girl Reading

Seattle's own Shout Your Abortion co-founder Amelia Bonow joins Australian writer Clementine Ford for a discussion about feminism in 2018. Fight Like a Girl is a book that expands on Ford's popular TED Talk about rape culture, among other topics. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, September 13: Not Even Bones Reading

The publisher describes Rebecca Schaeffer's young adult fantasy as "Dexter meets This Savage Song, which probably doesn't make the author feel nervous or annoyed at all. It's about a girl who sells body parts in a world where magic exists. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, September 14: Seattle Music Machine Salon

Ada's Technical Books has an array of nerdy events for its customers. Tonight, the Seattle Music Machine Salon meets at the shop. The SMMS meetings feature "a presentation and a guided discussion on some aspect of making music with computers and electronics." It's intended for all skill levels, including amateurs. Ada’s Technical Books, 425 15th Ave, 322-1058, http://seattletechnicalbooks.com, 7 pm, $5.

Saturday, September 15: Three poets

Quenton Baker, who is the current Open Books Poet in Residence, joins former Seattle Youth Poet Laureate Lily Baumgart and Washington State Poet Laureate, Claudia Castro Luna for a chill Saturday night reading. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, September 16: The Lost Art of Reading Reading

Subtitled Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time, David Ulin's book is a call to celebrate the act of reading in a world that seems dead set against the act of paying attention to anything for more than two seconds. Ulin, who was the editor of the Los Angeles Times's book review section, is just the person to answer this question. I'll be joining him onstage to talk about the book and literary criticism and possibly the impossibility of focusing on books in a time when Donald Trump is president.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Literary Event of the Week: The Mere Wife reading at the Seattle Public Library

Maria Dahvana Headley has had something like twenty writing careers packed into a single life. Back when she lived in Seattle, she published a memoir titled My Year of Yes, about an experiment in which she said yes to every single offer for a year. (Before you roll your eyes at the premise, you should know that this was at the very beginning of the "my year of..." craze, before the market became oversaturated in stunt memoirs.)

Headley's written young adult science fiction novels and alternate histories. She's won major awards for her short fiction. She's co-edited an anthology with Neil Gaiman. She's published and produced plays. Every few years, she reinvents herself, and every few years she seems even more comfortable in her own skin.

With her latest novel for adults, Headley proves that her ambition is as wide-ranging as her talent. The Mere Wife goes back to the roots of literature with an audacious twist: it's a retelling of Beowulf, set in suburban America. Headley is manipulating myths and legends with the confidence of a writer twice her age, and the reviews have been euphoric.

Tonight, Headley returns to Seattle for a conversation with another hometown literary hero — Nicola Griffith, author of Hild and So Lucky. The two writers have a lot in common: they tackle big ideas with zero apologies, and they both approach genre with a beautiful and ornate prose style. This should be a night to remember.

Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 3rd - September 9th

Monday, September 3: Labor Day

Happy Labor Day!

Tuesday, September 4: Night and Silence

Seattle fantasy author Seanan McGuire's October Daye series of novels is about a woman torn between the human world and the world of the faerie. Her latest novel, Night and Silence, sees Days reeling from recent events. When an estranged member of her family disappears, she starts down a newer, darker path. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, September 5: Reading Through It

On the first Wednesday of every month, the Seattle Review of Books co-hosts a book club at Third Place Books to talk about current events, history, and the culture of why America is as screwed up as it is. Tonight's book, Kurt Andersen's Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History, is at once current events, history, and a cultural story. Andersen explains our country's long relationship with hucksterism, from P.T. Barnum to Trump.

Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Alternate Wednesday, September 5: Assembly

Whenever we recommend a SRoB- adjacent event, we always try to offer you an alternate event on the same day that doesn't have a conflict of interest. Assembly Open Mic is a reading series curated by local DIY literary powerhouse Kate Berwanger, who I interviewed last month. It's a supportive environment intended for authors just starting out to share what they've been working on, and there's booze around for you to enjoy. Screwdriver Bar, 2320 First Ave, 485-7116, http://www.screwdriverbar.com, 7 pm, free, 21+.

Thursday, September 6: Emerald Street

As a lecture accompanying a film subtitled Race, Class, Culture, and the History of Hip-Hop in the Northwest, Seattle author Daudi Abe discusses Seattle's distinctive hip-hop history and what it says about our region. If you think Macklemore invented rap in Seattle, you are in dire need of an education. Scarecrow Video, 5030 Roosevelt Way NE, http://www.scarecrow.com/, 7:30 pm, free.

Friday, September 7: Kickdown Reading

Visiting author Rebecca Clarren is in Seattle to read from her debut novel, Kickdown. It's about sisters whose rural lives turn upside down when an Iraq War veteran enters their orbit. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, September 8: Pistil Books

If you've lived in Seattle for a couple decades or more, you likely remember a small Capitol Hill bookstore called Pistil Books. Located near the Wild Rose, Pistil was a small but well-curated bookstore with a good selection of zines. Though they still sell books online, for one day a year Pistil reconstitutes in the form of a physical bookstore, as the owners sell used books in a giant yard sale, with books selling for one or two bucks a pop.

Pistil Books, 1415 E Union St, http://www.pistilbooks.net, 10 am, free.

Sunday, September 9: Poetry of Place with Laura Da'

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, Capitol Hill Branch, 425 Harvard Ave E, http://spl.org, 2 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 27th - September 2nd

Monday, August 27: To the Bridge Reading

Nancy Rommelmann's latest true crime story is about an Oregon mother who dropped both of her children in a river. Rommelmann will appear in conversation with Seattle's own true crime author Claudia Rowe, whose book The Spider and the Fly took a new angle on the traditional serial-killer story.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, August 28: Cocaine + Surfing Reading

Chas Smith has written for Vice and been a war correspondent for Current TV. His new book is a history of the connection between cocaine and surfing. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, August 29: American Chordata Reading

Local editor Matthew Hitchman celebrates a new issue of the gorgeous literary magazine American Chordata with contributors. This is a good way to get a handle on one of the more exciting new-ish literary magazine on the stands right now. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, August 30: Sanpaku Reading

Kate Gavino is the cartoonist behind Last Night's Reading, a blog featuring cartoons about author events that was then turned into a book. She's giving a reading of her own, of a new fictionalized comic memoir called Sanpaku. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, August 31; Saturday, September 1; Sunday, September 2: Bumbershoot

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Seattle Center, https://www.bumbershoot.com/2018-lineup/

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 20th - August 26th

Monday, August 20: The Art of the Wasted Day Reading

Patricia Hampl's book is a travelogue exploring the life and times of some of the best leisure-seekers in history. One of those rest-experts is credited as the inventor of the personal essay. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, August 21: Welcome to the Writer's Life Reading

Seattle author Paulette Perlach's new book is subtitled How to Design Your Writing Craft, Writing Business, Writing Practice, and Reading Practice. The publisher describes it as "Like a freshman orientation for writers." Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, August 22: By the Shore Reading

Nancy Blakey's new book is a one-stop shop for those who are eager to explore the watery parts of the Pacific Northwest, from seafood recipes to kayaking instructions to travel tips to nature guides. Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, August 23: Next Exit

This is a celebration of indigenous artists including a number of exciting young bands, as well as the poetry of Sasha LaPointe, Sara Marie Ortiz, and DinéYazhi. Artists from Washington, Oregon, and New Mexico will appear at this event. Henry Art Gallery, UW Campus, 543-2280, http://www.henryart.org/, 6 pm, $12

Friday, August 24: A Girl's Guide to Missiles Reading

Karen Piper's memoir is about growing up a Navy brat on an outpost in the Mojave Desert. It's about nuclear terror, evangelical Christians, and Amway. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, August 25: Seattle Urban Book Expo

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Centilia Cultural Center, 1660 S Roberto Maestas Festival St,973-4298, 1 pm, free.

Sunday, August 26: Surreal Storytelling with Strange Women

This event features local artists including curator Kate Berwanger and artists Meredith Clark, Anastacia-Reneé, and Vivian Hua.

Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 13th - August 19th

Monday, August 13: Thrilling Tales After Dark

The Seattle Public Library's story time event for grownups continues with a special reading of the short story "End of the Day," by Jane Speed. The quote supplied by the library from this story is as follows:
I swear, I’d lose my head if it wasn’t connected to my shoulders! Now where on earth did I put my husband?
Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, August 14: DIY Resistance Reading

Portland author Anthony Alvarado's DIY Resistance: 36 Ways to Fight Back explains ways to defend values, protect communities, and find like-minded people in these Trumpy times. Alvarado is also the author of a book about creativity, so don't expect your standard litany of policy points, here. This should be a vibrant book and event. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, August 15: Welcome to the Writer’s Life Reading

If Welcome to the Writer's Life is as funny and disarming as author Paulette Perlach's website, you're in for a treat. Underneath a positively glowing "about the author" section on her site is a section explaining all the high-profile magazines that have rejected her writing over the years and the great sentences "She is a four-time submitter to the Jack Straw Fellowship. She thought the Pulitzer Prize was the Pullit Surprise until she was like 17. At age 28, she attended an 8-month writing residency in her mom’s downstairs bedroom." Tonight's book launch party features a "Bad Author's Photo Booth" with lots of pretentious props like berets and quills and such. Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, http://hotelsorrento.com, 6 pm, free, 21+.

Thursday, August 16: The Great Alone Reading

Incredibly popular author Kristin Hannah returns with a new novel about a former POW who moves his family to Alaska to get off the grid. Hannah will be joined in conversation with Washington author Megan Chance. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free; signing with purchase of book.

Friday, August 17: Rising Reading

Elizabeth Rush's new book is titled Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore. It's about the coastline that will develop after global warming has its way with our polar ice caps. It's not cheery subject matter, but for God's sake we've got to get serious about this stuff, right? Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, August 18: Economic Utopias and Dystopias

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Tashiro Kaplan Artist Lofts, 115 Prefontaine Place S, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/economic-utopias-and-dystopias-tickets-48071143083, 1 pm, free.

Sunday, August 19: #Murdertrending and Pyromantic Reading

Gretchen McNeil is the author of comedic young adult novels including I'm Not Your Manic Pixie Dream Girl. Her newest is a funny horror book titled #Murdertrending. Seattle writer Lish McBride has written a bunch of series for young readers. Pyromantic is the second in a new series that started with the book Firebug. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 6th - August 12th

Monday, August 6: Nothing Good Can Come From This Reading

The essay collection Nothing Good Can Come From This is a much-anticipated book by Kristi Coulter, whose essay about quitting drinking became a huge internet sensation. Now, she's being compared to writers like David Sedaris, which is hugely unfair but which publisher PR reps (and bad book reviewers) love to do to essayists who are funny. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, August 7: Terrarium Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday August 8: A Terrible Country Reading

Keith Gessen is a journalist, an editor, and a damned fine novelist. You might know him as a driving force behind the magazine N+1, or as a brilliant cultural critic, or an early advocate of the Occupy movement. Tonight, he's in town to read from his new novel A Terrible Country, which is about a young man who returns to his home country of Russia in order to care for his ailing grandmother. After the reading, I'll be interviewing Gessen onstage. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, August 9: Word Works

Ben Lerner is a MacArthur "Genius"-winning poet who draws parallels between science and poetry in his work. His work is brainy and it requires work. He is exactly the kind of writer who should be hosting one of Hugo House's Word Works series. Frye Art Museum. 704 Terry Ave., 622-9250, http://fryemuseum.org, 7 pm, $15.

Friday, August 10: Choose Your Own Disaster Reading

Dana Schwartz's Choose Your Own Disaster is a comedic memoir "about the millennial experience and modern feminism." It also is in the form of a personality test. Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, August 12: Prairie Fires Reading

Caroline Fraser's Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle award and it wound up on many year-end best-of lists. And now she's making a Sunday afternoon appearance at Elliott Bay Book Company. These readings are usually more intimate than the weeknight events, so you might have an opportunity to enjoy more time and attention from an award-winning author. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Literary Event of the Week: Terrarium reading at Elliott Bay Book Company

Aside from having a fantastic name, Valerie Trueblood is best known as one of Seattle's most accomplished short story writers. She has been on shortlists for the PEN Faulkner Award and the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Prize, and her work has been praised in all the usual New York media outlets.

But if you're not the kind of person who is moved by accolades — and, really, who can blame you? — then perhaps Roxane Gay's seal of approval might inspire you to pick up Trueblood's work? Gay says Trueblood's writing is "bursting with a genuine violence of health and strength of will that make each of her stories so engaging." Gay continues, "What I love most about her writing is how her stories are, at once bittersweet, joyful and mournful in equal measure."

After about four years out of the spotlight, Trueblood is returning with Terrarium, a career-spanning collection that brings together her classic work and dozens of new stories. It's a statement piece, a book that seems to be intended to mark her as a real American master of the short story.

Terrarium is made up of the best stories from Trueblood's three previous collections, and 30 new stories. These are stories with killer first lines ("She was a young married woman who fell in love.") and final images that will leave your mouth hanging open (like the description of the whorls of a tornado as "a fingerprint big as God's.")

In the chronological arrangement of the stories in Terrarium, you can follow the arc of Trueblood's career, and change is definitely afoot. Trueblood is getting more and more minimalist in her work. The rambling earlier works that considered the journey to be just as important as the destination give way to tiny one or two pages stories. Trueblood is distilling the idea of fiction down to something pocket-sized.

Tomorrow night, Trueblood celebrates Terrarium's release day at Elliott Bay Book Company with a reading and a little celebration. If Terrarium becomes as well-regarded as it should, this might be your last opportunity to say you saw her read before she became a celebrity in the world of short fiction. Seattle needs to step up and embrace Trueblood before the rest of the world tries to claim her.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 30th - August 5th

Monday, July 30: Give Me Your Hand Reading

Megan Abbott's thriller is about a secret and a friendship and, as is usually the case with these sorts of things, betrayal. Abbott is an acclaimed thriller writer and she also writes for TV. (Real TV, like HBO, not some crappy sitcom.) Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 31: Seattle Poetry Slam Sendoff

See our Event of the Week column for more details. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave S, http://theroyalroomseattle.com, 8 pm, $10.

Wednesday, August 1: Cracking the Sky Reading

Brenda Cooper is a prolific science fiction writer and futurist. She has written with Larry Niven, which basically makes her sci-fi royalty. Cracking the Sky, her most recent book, is a collection of short fiction that examines themes of environmentalism, which is a lifelong passion of hers. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, August 2: The Annotated Big Sleep Reading

Owen Hill's latest book is an annotation of Raymond Chandler's classic detective novel. These annotated guides are a real pleasure to read, particularly in works that have maybe lost some nuance due to the time they were published in. While I haven't read this particular edition, I suspect that Chandler's work will feed well into the annotation format. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Friday, August 3: Raven Chronicles Volume 26 Reading

The 26th volume of Seattle-based literary magazine Raven Chronicles is based on the theme "Last Call." That's because after this issue, they'll be ceasing publication of the magazine and focusing on an "ongoing book publication program." Tonight, a ton of readers will celebrate this last hurrah, and toast the future. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, August 4: Advice for Future Corpses Reaading

Sallie Tisdale is an award-winning writer and a palliative care nurse. Her most recent book is about how to die, and how to help your loved ones die, and what to expect in the dying experience. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, August 5: Ghost Of Reading

This is a reading to celebrate the debut collection of poet Diana Khoi Nguyen. She's joined by Montana poet Prageeta Sharma and Seattle poet Ryo Yamaguchi, who works at poetry press Wave Books. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 6 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 23 - July 29

Monday, July 23: Inside Witnesses

In 2013, a man with a gun walked into the Twilight Exit bar and shot his gun. Local journalist Marti Jonjak happened to be in the bar that night, and ever since she's devoted a considerable amount of effort to documenting exactly what happened on that evening and why. Tonight, she'll appear in conversation with one of the other witnesses at the shooting. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 24: Suicide Club Reading

Rachel Heng's debut sci-fi novel, Suicide Club, imagines a future in which humans live long — maybe even endless — lives. It's a beautiful, inquisitive, adventurous novel that uses sci-fi to examine our obsessions with youth and mortality and self-control. I'll be interviewing Heng onstage at this reading. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Alternate Tuesday, July 24: Ellen Datlow

Because I'm involved with the Rachel Heng reading, I'm offering another event with no conflict of interest for you to consider. As part of sci-fi writing organization Clarion West's summer reading series, sci-fi writer and editor Ellen Datlow. She's worked at OMNI Magazine and Tor.com and she's probably edited some of your very favorite science fiction authors. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, July 25: Beginner's Luck Reading

Malcolm Terence, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, headed out in the aftermath of the Love Generation to join up with a back-to-the-land commune. As the pastoral dream died, people eventually wandered off and tried to reconcile their dreams with reality. This book tells that story. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, July 26: Stay with Me Reading

Nigerian author Ayobami Adebayo's debut novel is finally out in paperback. It's about a wife whose husband brings home a second wife after some marital discord. Adebayo wrote part of her book at Hedgebrook, Washington's amazing women's writing organization. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, July 27: South Asian Writers of the Pacific Northwest

Local writers including Jordan Alam, Sasha Duttchoudhury, Jasleena Grewal, Shankar Narayan, and organizer Sonora Jha read and discuss what it means to be a writer of South Asian descent in this part of the world. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7 pm, free.

Saturday, July 28: Body Image, Identity, and Sisterhood

Local author Donna Miscolta, who is a frequent Seattle Review of Books contributor, will share excerpts from a draft of her upcoming novel, Ofelia and Norma and discuss identity and community. White Center Library, 1409 SW 107th St, 243-0233 , https://kcls.org, 1:30 pm, free.

Sunday, July 29: I Am Still Alive Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 2 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 16th - July 22nd

Monday, July 16: Beyond Measure Reading

Rachel Z. Arndt has written a collection of essays about the way we quantify our lives: our weights, the times we wake up and go to sleep, the way we try to make ourselves a set of facts and figures for prospective dating partners. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 17: Karen Joy Fowler

You might best know Karen Joy Fowler for her breakout novel The Jane Austen Book Club, and that novel is a delightful modernization of Austen's work. Her latest novel, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, is about a family that raises a chimpanzee as though it was a human child. But sci-fi writing organization Clarion West is bringing Fowler to town because she's also a writer of science fiction and fantasy. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, July 18: Folio Grand Reopening

Folio, the private library/events space/coworking space, has moved from its birthplace under the downtown YMCA to a new spot in the Pike Place Market. Today, you are invited to come and meet the Folio board and check out the new digs, which look quite nice. We'll have more about the new space presently on this here website. Folio: The Seattle Atheneum, Pike Place Market, 93 Pike St #307, http://www.folioseattle.org 4 pm, free.

Thursday, July 19: Sick Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, July 20: The Corpse at the Crystal Palace Reading

Carola Dunn writes the kind of mysteries that get described as "beloved." Her Daisy Dalrymple series bounces a plucky heroine around in the 1920s, solving mysteries and meeting interesting people. In other words, this is a perfect summertime literary event for you. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, July 21: Chain Letter

The Capitol Hill reading series returns with a sweaty summer edition featuring Alex Bleecker, Eveline Müller, Nica Selvaggio, and the excellent Graham Isaac. *Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 7 pm, free.