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Literary Event of the Week: Terrarium reading at Elliott Bay Book Company

Aside from having a fantastic name, Valerie Trueblood is best known as one of Seattle's most accomplished short story writers. She has been on shortlists for the PEN Faulkner Award and the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Prize, and her work has been praised in all the usual New York media outlets.

But if you're not the kind of person who is moved by accolades — and, really, who can blame you? — then perhaps Roxane Gay's seal of approval might inspire you to pick up Trueblood's work? Gay says Trueblood's writing is "bursting with a genuine violence of health and strength of will that make each of her stories so engaging." Gay continues, "What I love most about her writing is how her stories are, at once bittersweet, joyful and mournful in equal measure."

After about four years out of the spotlight, Trueblood is returning with Terrarium, a career-spanning collection that brings together her classic work and dozens of new stories. It's a statement piece, a book that seems to be intended to mark her as a real American master of the short story.

Terrarium is made up of the best stories from Trueblood's three previous collections, and 30 new stories. These are stories with killer first lines ("She was a young married woman who fell in love.") and final images that will leave your mouth hanging open (like the description of the whorls of a tornado as "a fingerprint big as God's.")

In the chronological arrangement of the stories in Terrarium, you can follow the arc of Trueblood's career, and change is definitely afoot. Trueblood is getting more and more minimalist in her work. The rambling earlier works that considered the journey to be just as important as the destination give way to tiny one or two pages stories. Trueblood is distilling the idea of fiction down to something pocket-sized.

Tomorrow night, Trueblood celebrates Terrarium's release day at Elliott Bay Book Company with a reading and a little celebration. If Terrarium becomes as well-regarded as it should, this might be your last opportunity to say you saw her read before she became a celebrity in the world of short fiction. Seattle needs to step up and embrace Trueblood before the rest of the world tries to claim her.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 30th - August 5th

Monday, July 30: Give Me Your Hand Reading

Megan Abbott's thriller is about a secret and a friendship and, as is usually the case with these sorts of things, betrayal. Abbott is an acclaimed thriller writer and she also writes for TV. (Real TV, like HBO, not some crappy sitcom.) Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 31: Seattle Poetry Slam Sendoff

See our Event of the Week column for more details. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave S, http://theroyalroomseattle.com, 8 pm, $10.

Wednesday, August 1: Cracking the Sky Reading

Brenda Cooper is a prolific science fiction writer and futurist. She has written with Larry Niven, which basically makes her sci-fi royalty. Cracking the Sky, her most recent book, is a collection of short fiction that examines themes of environmentalism, which is a lifelong passion of hers. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, August 2: The Annotated Big Sleep Reading

Owen Hill's latest book is an annotation of Raymond Chandler's classic detective novel. These annotated guides are a real pleasure to read, particularly in works that have maybe lost some nuance due to the time they were published in. While I haven't read this particular edition, I suspect that Chandler's work will feed well into the annotation format. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Friday, August 3: Raven Chronicles Volume 26 Reading

The 26th volume of Seattle-based literary magazine Raven Chronicles is based on the theme "Last Call." That's because after this issue, they'll be ceasing publication of the magazine and focusing on an "ongoing book publication program." Tonight, a ton of readers will celebrate this last hurrah, and toast the future. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, August 4: Advice for Future Corpses Reaading

Sallie Tisdale is an award-winning writer and a palliative care nurse. Her most recent book is about how to die, and how to help your loved ones die, and what to expect in the dying experience. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, August 5: Ghost Of Reading

This is a reading to celebrate the debut collection of poet Diana Khoi Nguyen. She's joined by Montana poet Prageeta Sharma and Seattle poet Ryo Yamaguchi, who works at poetry press Wave Books. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 6 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 23 - July 29

Monday, July 23: Inside Witnesses

In 2013, a man with a gun walked into the Twilight Exit bar and shot his gun. Local journalist Marti Jonjak happened to be in the bar that night, and ever since she's devoted a considerable amount of effort to documenting exactly what happened on that evening and why. Tonight, she'll appear in conversation with one of the other witnesses at the shooting. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 24: Suicide Club Reading

Rachel Heng's debut sci-fi novel, Suicide Club, imagines a future in which humans live long — maybe even endless — lives. It's a beautiful, inquisitive, adventurous novel that uses sci-fi to examine our obsessions with youth and mortality and self-control. I'll be interviewing Heng onstage at this reading. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Alternate Tuesday, July 24: Ellen Datlow

Because I'm involved with the Rachel Heng reading, I'm offering another event with no conflict of interest for you to consider. As part of sci-fi writing organization Clarion West's summer reading series, sci-fi writer and editor Ellen Datlow. She's worked at OMNI Magazine and Tor.com and she's probably edited some of your very favorite science fiction authors. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, July 25: Beginner's Luck Reading

Malcolm Terence, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, headed out in the aftermath of the Love Generation to join up with a back-to-the-land commune. As the pastoral dream died, people eventually wandered off and tried to reconcile their dreams with reality. This book tells that story. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, July 26: Stay with Me Reading

Nigerian author Ayobami Adebayo's debut novel is finally out in paperback. It's about a wife whose husband brings home a second wife after some marital discord. Adebayo wrote part of her book at Hedgebrook, Washington's amazing women's writing organization. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, July 27: South Asian Writers of the Pacific Northwest

Local writers including Jordan Alam, Sasha Duttchoudhury, Jasleena Grewal, Shankar Narayan, and organizer Sonora Jha read and discuss what it means to be a writer of South Asian descent in this part of the world. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7 pm, free.

Saturday, July 28: Body Image, Identity, and Sisterhood

Local author Donna Miscolta, who is a frequent Seattle Review of Books contributor, will share excerpts from a draft of her upcoming novel, Ofelia and Norma and discuss identity and community. White Center Library, 1409 SW 107th St, 243-0233 , https://kcls.org, 1:30 pm, free.

Sunday, July 29: I Am Still Alive Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 2 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 16th - July 22nd

Monday, July 16: Beyond Measure Reading

Rachel Z. Arndt has written a collection of essays about the way we quantify our lives: our weights, the times we wake up and go to sleep, the way we try to make ourselves a set of facts and figures for prospective dating partners. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 17: Karen Joy Fowler

You might best know Karen Joy Fowler for her breakout novel The Jane Austen Book Club, and that novel is a delightful modernization of Austen's work. Her latest novel, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, is about a family that raises a chimpanzee as though it was a human child. But sci-fi writing organization Clarion West is bringing Fowler to town because she's also a writer of science fiction and fantasy. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, July 18: Folio Grand Reopening

Folio, the private library/events space/coworking space, has moved from its birthplace under the downtown YMCA to a new spot in the Pike Place Market. Today, you are invited to come and meet the Folio board and check out the new digs, which look quite nice. We'll have more about the new space presently on this here website. Folio: The Seattle Atheneum, Pike Place Market, 93 Pike St #307, http://www.folioseattle.org 4 pm, free.

Thursday, July 19: Sick Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, July 20: The Corpse at the Crystal Palace Reading

Carola Dunn writes the kind of mysteries that get described as "beloved." Her Daisy Dalrymple series bounces a plucky heroine around in the 1920s, solving mysteries and meeting interesting people. In other words, this is a perfect summertime literary event for you. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, July 21: Chain Letter

The Capitol Hill reading series returns with a sweaty summer edition featuring Alex Bleecker, Eveline Müller, Nica Selvaggio, and the excellent Graham Isaac. *Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 9th - July 15th

Monday, July 9: What the Eyes Don't See Reading

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician who helped to blow the whistle on Flint's water crisis (which is, I would like to remind you, still ongoing.) Her memoir about that experience is titled What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave S. https://www.langstonseattle.org/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 10: Karen Lord

Clarion West brings a Barbadian author from the Caribbean to Seattle as part of their fantastic summer reading series. She'll discuss sci-fi and teaching sci-fi. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, July 11: Spoonbenders Reading

Daryl Gregory's novel Spoonbenders is a novel about a family of psychics. It's already been signed for a big adaptation to television and it was a big old bestseller on its release. Now it's out in paperback, and Gregory just moved to Seattle. Come on out and meet one of Seattle's most popular authors. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, July 12: Forms of the Book

This one looks like a doozy. Three of Seattle's smartest, most inventive writers — Amaranth Borsuk, Doug Nufer, and Shin Yu Pai — get together to discuss the past present and future of the book. Ada’s Technical Books, 425 15th Ave, 322-1058, http://seattletechnicalbooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, July 13: The Rat Tree Reading

The Seattle novelist Susan M. Carr reads from her latest book, about family reunion at a pool party. In the middle of the party, two young family members accidentally uncover their grandfather's big trunk full of Nazi memorabilia. Things unravel from there. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, July 14: Hot Off the Press Book Fair

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore, 5 pm, free.

Sunday, July 15: Little Moments of Love Reading

I love Catana Chetwynd's comics. Her characters look like fetuses — half-formed round heads with huge eyes and stubby little hands — but she uses them to capture moments in a relationship: differences in height, weird food hangups, drunken shenanigans. They're fantastic little windows into a very private part of life, usually shared between two people. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 2nd - July 8th

Monday, July 2: Tonight I'm Someone Else Reading

Chelsea Hodson's book of essays touches on jobs she's held (including at NASA) and discusses the idea of submission and commodification in human interactions. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, July 3: the empty season Reading

Seattle poets EJ Koh, Sarah Galvin, Quenton Baker and Joshua Marie Wilkinson help poet Catherine Bresner debut her first collection of poetry into the world. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, July 4: Independence Day

Go watch stuff blow up and feel ashamed to be an American.

Thursday, July 5: Nordic Stories

The beautiful new Nordic Museum's "storytelling-and-crafts program for preschool-aged children and their grown-ups" continues with a reading of the book Daisy Darling, Let's Go to the Beach by Markus Majaluoma. The author is not in attendance. This is a story time for kids. Nordic Museum, 2655 NW Market St, http://nordicmuseum.org/future, 10 am, free.

Saturday, July 7: Poets in the Park 2018

See our Event of the Week for more details. Anderson Park, 7802 168th Ave NE, 11 am, http://www.graceguts.com/poets-in-the-park, free.

Sunday, July 8: Mr. Neutron and The Songs We Hide Reading

Two authors who have taken writing classes on Whidbey Island, Joe Ponepinto and Connie Hampton Connally, read from their books. Mr. Neutron is about American politics. Hampton Connally's The Songs We Hide is about Budapest. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 25th - July 1st

Monday, June 25: Hiking Washington's Fire Lookouts Reading

Mountaineers Books explains Amber Casali's book this way: "[Washington's] fire lookouts not only have played an important role in forest fire management, but have also been temporary homes for the interesting people who spend summers isolated from civilization to watch over the forests below." Casali's book details 44 such lookouts and describes the hikes. Tonight, she'll talk about her favorite hikes. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, June 26: Clarion West Presents: Ken Macleod

The Scottish author of science fiction comes to Seattle as part of sci-fi writing group Clarion West's famous summer reading series. MacLeod writes novels about unions in the future and the ultimate fusion of computer and human consciousness. This ought to be a fascinating evening. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, June 27: American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin Reading

Terrance Hayes is one of America's best poets. His latest book collects 70 sonnets written to the assassin who will one day kill Hayes. Hayes will likely also discuss the work he's doing to revive and recontextualize the work of the deceased poet Etheridge Knight. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave S. https://www.langstonseattle.org/, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, June 28: Side Life Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, June 29: A Storytelling Event

At the time of this writing, the only information that I have about this event is that it's hosted by Jane Wong and it involves poets from Cave Canem, Kundiman, and CantoMundo Poets. That's enough to earn my vote for the best event of the night. CantoMundo is an organization that supports and elevates the work of Latinx poets. Kundiman self-describes as "a national organization dedicated to the creation and cultivation of Asian American creative writing." And Cave Canem is an organization that has long represented and inspired Black poets. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, June 30: Shades and Shadows

Tim Long writes novels about zombies and war. Crystal Connor writes books about witchcraft and horror. Tyrell Johnson's "The Wolves of Winter is a post-apocalyptic novel set in a wintry world. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 4 pm, free.*

Sunday, July 1: Yoon Ha Lee

Sci-fi author Yoon Ha Lee, who also creates video games, will appear in conversation with local sci-fi author (and Gar LaSalle Storyteller Award winner) E Lily Yu. Wing Luke Museum, 719 S. King St 623-5124, http//wingluke.org, 2 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 18th - June 24th

Monday, June 18: A Reading for Refugees

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Intrigue Chocolate, 1520 15th Ave, 945-3277, https://www.intriguechocolate.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, June 19: Juneteenth Storytelling Event

This is a storytelling celebration of Juneteenth with local Black musicians, comedians, and other storytellers sharing tales of freedom. Related: Why the fuck isn't Juneteenth a national holiday? Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute, 104 17th Ave S, 684-4757, http://langstoninstitute.org, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, June 20: WordsWest Kids' Night

This special children's-themed edition of the popular West Seattle reading series brings Suzanne Selfors, author of Spirit Riding Free: Lucky and the Mustangs of Miradero (which is now a Netflix series) and Dana Claire Simpson, who creates the webcomic Phoebe and Her Unicorn. C&P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave SW, http://wordswestliterary.weebly.com, 6 pm, free.

Thursday, June 21: Roxane Gay

Last week, I reviewed a timely reissue of Roxane Gay's debut short story collection. This week, Gay is in town with Not That Bad, an anthology of women's stories in these #MeToo-y times. No matter what book you leave this reading with, you'll be satisfied. Gay is one of our most important writers. University Temple United Methodist Church, 1415 NE 43rd St, 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, $16.99 - $26.99.

Friday, June 22: Alexandra Mattraw and Amber Nelson

Berkeley poet Alexandra Mattraw celebrates the publication of her first book, small siren, with Seattle poet Amber Nelson, who used to be a publisher but is now happily doing more readings of her own work more frequently around town. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, June 23: Locus Awards Weekend

Locus Magazine is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a three-day sci-fi orgy including a banquet, a bunch of classes for aspiring sci-fi writers, appearances from Seattle writers like Greg Bear and Nisi Shawl, and a big damn awards ceremony! Best Western Executive Inn, 200 Taylor Avenue N, https://locusmag.com/2018-locus-awards-weekend/, Fri-Sun, $65.

Sunday, June 24: 100 Things Sounders Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die Reading

Seattle Times writer Geoff Baker presents a new book full of information about Seattle's soccer team, The Sounders. It also has the promise of death in the title, but it's probably not a super-morbid read or anything like that. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 11th - June 17th

Monday, June 11: *Circe Reading

Madeline Miller's Circe was one of the big literary surprises of the spring: a novel that reaches back into mythology and gives voice to a goddess who is often shunted off to the side. Miller will appear in conversation with Nancy Pearl. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, June 12: Rock Steady Reading

Ellen Forney is the one thing on which both old Seattle and new Seattle can agree. Ellen Forney's illustrations are like beams of pure happiness fired straight into your cerebral cortex. Ellen Forney's latest book, Rock Steady, is a mental health guide for people who are suffering from mental disorders. It is a book that will save lives. Thank you, Ellen Forney. Ada’s Technical Books, 425 15th Ave, 322-1058, http://seattletechnicalbooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, June 13: Like a Mother Reading, Moss Volume 3 Release Party

See our Event(s) of the Week Column for more details. The Summit, 420 E. Pike St., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org, 7:30 pm, $5, 21+. and Type Set, 3827C, S Edmunds St, https://www.typesetseattle.com/, 7 p.m., free.

Thursday, June 14: The Emperor of Shoes Reading

An American in China takes over his father's shoe factory in author Spencer Wise's new novel. With the help of a Chinese seamstress, the protagonist eventually comes to realize that the factory is an exploitative pit of despair, and unimaginably corrupt besides. Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, June 15: Whirlaway Reading

Poe Ballantine has been writing for a very long time now — it's been nearly 15 years since his novel God Clobbers Us All was published. And Ballantine has attracted a ferocious fanbase, full of people who love writing by the Beats but hate the shitty masculine tropes that come with the Beats. His latest novel, Whirlaway, is published by excellent Portland press Hawthorne Books, and it's about an escapee from a California asylum. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, June 16: Bloomsday Staged Reading

It's Bloomsday again, so get your Joyce on with this reading from Ulysses. If you're someone who tried and failed to enjoy Ulysses in print, hearing it read aloud might just be the key that unlocks the book for you. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 2:30 pm, free.

Sunday, June 17: The Grow House Reading

Seattle author Nick DiMartino debuts his latest thriller, about a marijuana grow house in Maple Leaf which becomes the subject of unwelcome attention and a bookseller who wanders into harm's way. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 4 - June 10

Monday, June 4: Planet Funny Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, June 5: Orca Reading

Did you know that June is Orca Awareness Month? See? You’re learning something already. At this Town Hall event, environmental professor Jason M. Colby reads about the love-hate relationship between humanity and Orca whales, and how it mostly became a love-love relationship. University Lutheran Church, 1604 NE 50th St, https://townhallseattle.org, 7:30 pm, $5.

Wednesday, June 6: #WeToo: New Visions Of Consent & Reproductive Justice

This open mic asks, “What’s your story about reproductive rights, transgender justice, sex worker rights, abortion access, or being a survivor?” Share a piece of two minutes or less in a comforting, welcoming environment, sponsored in part by the awesome folks at Shout Your Abortion. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, June 7: Quiet Until the Thaw Reading

You probably know Alexandra Fuller best for her brilliant memoir Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, and maybe you’ve read Scribbling the Cat. Tonight, Fuller reads from the new paperback edition of her first foray into fiction, Quiet Until the Thaw. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, June 8: A Prenuptial Reading

On Saturday, poets Paige Lewis and Kaveh Akbar will get married. You’re not invited to that. But on Friday night, Lewis and Akbar are hosting a reading to celebrate Lewis’s first chapbook, Reasons to Wake You, and Akbar will read from his celebrated debut Calling a Wolf a Wolf. A number of other fine poets will be taking part in this public celebration of a couple on the cusp of wedded bliss.
Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, June 9: All Power: Visual Legacies of the Black Panther Party Panel Discussion

To celebrate the half-centennial of Seattle’s Black Panther Party, the Frye is hosting a “panel discussion examining the local impact of the aesthetic legacies of the Black Panther Party with artist, activist, and cultural policy expert Royal Alley-Barnes and King County Councilman Larry Gosset.” These Black Panther Party Events have been a lot of fun, and it’s truly moving to watch as people who were involved with the Party back at the beginning reunite after many decades apart. Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave, 622-9250, http://www.fryemuseum.org/, 2 pm, free.

Sunday, June 10: A Ridiculously Large Group Reading

This is a reading by authors Marina Blitshteyn, Dan Hoy, Abraham Smith, and Samantha Zighelboim, along with Seattle treasure Sarah Galvin. What a young, vibrant, exciting bill this is!

Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 28th - June 3rd

Monday, May 28: Northwest Folklife Festival

Today at Folklife, you can find all sorts of music, crafts, and food. Storytelling events include a story slam at 11 am, a Spanish-language reading from Seattle Escribe at 3:15 pm, and discussions of food and culture all day long. Seattle Center, 11 am, $10 suggested donation.

Tuesday, May 29: Aki Kurose Poetry Slam

Every year, the students of Aki Kurose Middle School read their poetry at Third Place Books Seward Park. This sounds like a great way to be inspired by a new generation of young writers. Come show your support. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, May 30: Writers in the Schools Reading

It’s a week for young writers! Students who participate in Seattle Arts and Lectures’s excellent Writers in the Schools program will read new work created in the program at this event. Meet tomorrow’s great new writers today! Students will read all sorts of original work: poetry, fiction, and memoir. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, May 31: Elements of a Bystander Reading

Seattle writer Juan Carlos Reyes celebrates the launch of a short story collection titled Elements of a Bystander. He’s joined by Seattle author and publisher Amber Nelson, who has a book out soon titled The Sexiest Man Alive. They’ll be joined by Jason McCall, who is the author of a book of poetry titled Two-Face God. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, June 1: Cascadia Magazine Party

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 6 pm, free.

Saturday, June 2: Summer Bookfest

Eagle Harbor Book Company hosts a murderer’s row of local talent in a two-hour book festival that benefits the Bainbridge School Foundation. Authors include Elizabeth George, Kathleen Alcala, Anastacia-Reneé, Carol Cassella, Waverly Fitzgerald, Jarret Middleton, Donna Miscolta, Claudia Rowe, and Anca L. Szilágyi. This is definitely worth the trip across the water. Eagle Harbor Book Company, 157 Winslow Way E, 842-5332, https://www.eagleharborbooks.com/, noon, free.

Sunday, June 3: Manuscript Class Dismissed

For a full year, students have taken Theo Pauline Nestor’s Hugo House Yearlong Manuscript Class, which helped them shepherd a memoir from concept to completion. This afternoon, the students will read from their work and maybe talk a little bit about the process of working with a close-knit group of people for such a long time on such an intimate type of writing. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 21st - May 27th

Monday, May 21: Brothers of the Gun Reading

The brilliant journalist and cartoonist Molly Crabapple recently illustrated Marwan Hisham's book Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War. Tonight, Hisham will Skype into the reading from Turkey and he and Crabapple will discuss Syria, war, and what it means to report on war.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, May 22: Seattle: City of Literature Party

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, May 23: Biblical Porn Reading

University of Washington anthropology professor Jessica Johnson reads from her new book Biblical Porn: Affect, Labor, and Pastor Mark Driscoll's Evangelical Empire, a scholarly look at the batshit crazy church run by a toxic masculine creep that basically took over Seattle not so long ago.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, May 24: Bushwick Book Club: The Handmaid's Tale

The Handmaid's Tale show on Hulu continues to be the most harrowing hour of television in the Trump era. Tonight, Seattle's most musical book group gathers to present new songs based on Margaret Atwood's depressingly prescient (depresscient?) sci-fi novel. Fremont Abbey, 4272 Fremont Ave N, http://thebushwickbookclubseattle.com, 7 pm, $10.

Friday, May 25: Stellar Poets from Near and Far!

It's not exactly clear from press materials if this reading has a theme or a reason for existing like a new book release, but you don't really need a reason with a lineup like this: Derrick Weston Brown, Bennie Heron, Bettina Judd, Quenton Baker, and Anastacia-Reneé.

Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, May 26: Daydreamin' Dave Release Party

Seattle cartoonist Ben Horak celebrates the release of his latest comic with an afternoon barbecue at the Fantagraphics Bookstore and Gallery in Georgetown. Daydreamin' Dave is a comic about a comic character who realizes he is in a comic book, and who then disappears from the comic book that he's ostensibly starring in. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore, 3 pm, free.

Sunday, May 27: Chosen Country Reading

Remember those Bundy assholes who took over government land because they were pissed they couldn't steal government land anymore? James Pogue wrote a whole book about the dumbfuck Bundy rebellion and all the assholes who mistakenly thought they could take the law into their own hands.

Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 14th - 20th

Monday, May 14: An Evening of Mahmoud Darwish Poetry

Prominent members of Seattle's Palestinian community, including poet Lena Khalaf Tuffaha and architect Rania Qawasma, celebrate the poetry of Mahmoud Darwish in a bilingual reading. Local poets Elizabeth Austen, Rick Barot, Jourdan Keith, Claudia Castro Luna, JM Miller, and Susan Rich, will also read work. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, May 15: So Lucky Reading

Nicola Griffith is one of Seattle's leading writers, by which I mean where Griffith leads, others follow. Tonight, she launches her latest book, a novel titled So Lucky. It's about a recently widowed woman who discovers that she has multiple sclerosis. You'll be hearing a lot more about this book here over the course of the week. (Griffith is also reading at Elliott Bay Book Company on Wednesday night.) Phinney Books, 7405 Greenwood Ave. N, 297-2665, http://phinneybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, May 16: WordsWest

The West Seattle literary series, which recently helped to save independent coffee shop C&P Coffee Company from closing down, continues with the theme "Home Unsettled Home." The headline readers are Rachel Kessler and Matthew Zapruder, so this is going to be a lot of fun. C & P Coffee Co., 5612 California Ave SW, 7 pm, http://WordsWestLiterary.com/, free.

Thursday, May 17: Seattle Reads Homegoing

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Friday, May 18: Jack Straw Writers Program

Every year, Jack Straw recruits a squad of emerging Seattle writers and teaches them how to be more confident when reading, recording, and producing their work in other media. These readings are a great way to see what the writers have learned. Tonight's readers include Jalayna Carter, Sarah María Medina, Daniel Atkinson, and Rachel Trignano. Jack Straw Gallery, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., 634-0919, http://jackstraw.org, 7 pm, $5.

Saturday, May 19: Seattle's Book Fair

Presented by Seattle's Reading Divas, this celebration of local authors including Tela Allen, Alecia Coody, Leslie Cronkhite, Latoya Ralliford, Royal Prince, and many more features food, signings, games, music and a bunch of books you can buy. New Holly Hall, 7054 32nd Ave S, 12pm - 6 pm, free.

Sunday, May 20: Against Memoir Reading

Michelle Tea is a goddamned titan. Her latest non-fiction book, an essay collection titled Against Memoir, is subtitled Complaints, Confessions & Criticisms, and it covers topics as wide-ranging as lesbian biker gangs and ice cream shops. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 7th - May 13th

Monday, May 7: The Book Reading

Amaranth Borsuk teaches at University of Washington Bothell, and her latest book is nothing less than a history of the book as an object, an examination of what the book has meant for society, and a consideration of what the book might become. If you're on this site, you care about this book. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, May 8: Offbeat Ada's

This is a conversation about the "fantasies and realities of feminist romance novels." Seattle author Ariel Meadow Stallings, author of The Offbeat Bride, talks with Seattle-area feminist romance author Jasmine Silvera about her new book Dancer's Flame. They'll also discuss diversity in romance, which is a thorny issue. Ada's Technical Books, 425 15th Ave, 322-1058, http://seattletechnicalbooks.com, 6 pm, free.

Wednesday, May 9: Castalia

The ongoing UW MFA program reading series continues with readings from students Alex Moni-Sauri and Jordyn Murray. Joining the students are UW MFA alumni Gabrielle Bates and UW professors David Bosworth and Pimone Triplett. As always, I feel duty-bound to point out that "Pimone Triplett" is the best name ever for a poet. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7:45 pm, free.

Thursday, May 10: Side Life Reading

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Friday, May 11: Hugo Literary Series

An amazing array of writers - Portland novelist Lidia Yuknavitch, poet Tarfia Faizullah, and the indefatigable Ijeoma Oluo - present new work, along with singer-songwriter Nick Droz, on the theme "There Goes the Neighborhood." Northwest Film Forum, $25 Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, $25.

Saturday, May 12: Two Sci-fi Writers

Two Seattle-area sci-fi writers team up to present one humdinger of a reading. Kat Richardson is debuting a new series under the sneaky pseudonym "K.R. Richardson." Blood Orbit is the first in a series of sci-fi police procedural novels. What will forensics be like in the future? Richardson will be in conversation with Rhiannon Held, who is the author of the Silver series of urban fantasy novels, which just concluded with the release of Death-Touched. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 6 pm, free.

Sunday, May 13: Ramayana: An Illustrated Retelling Reading

Elliott Bay Book Company reading coordinator Rick Simonson regularly attends a huge book festival in India, and his knowledge of works in translation is nigh-encyclopedaic. This afternoon, Elliott Bay welcomes someone who falls into both those areas of interest: Arshia Sattar is a world-class translator, and she's translated some of the finest Indian classics of literature into English. For this trip, she's reading from her latest book, which is an adaptation of a classic further adapted for children.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 3 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 30 - May 6

Monday, April 30: Rock Steady Reading

Ellen Forney is a living Seattle legend. Even if you don't know her work, you know her work - even if it's as "the person who drew those amazing gigantic white hands on red background at the Capitol Hill light rail stop." More likely, you know her from her comics in The Stranger from years ago, or her amazing memoir about life with bipolar disorder, Marbles, or any of her billion other amazing projects. Her latest book, Rock Steady, is an advice book for people with mood disorders. Tonight, she's in conversation with other living Seattle legend, David Schmader. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, May 1: Keep Marching Reading

If you don't know Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner, you really should. She's a co-founder of the amazing activist group MomsRising, which advocates for gun safety and public breastfeeding and just about every cause that matters. Tonight, she reads from her new guide for women in politics, Keep Marching: How Every Woman Can Take Action and Change Our World. She'll talk onstage with someone who also knows a lot about that: Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, May 2: Five Poets

Five authors from across the gender and poetic spectrums come together to read in Wallingford' holiest space. Readers include Olympia's Moss Hope Angel; "genderqueer glitch performer " RE Katz; Tacoma's Chloe Rose, whose "gender is Rilke's dark god;" and Boulder author Kolby Harvey. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, May 3: Night Hawks Reading

Friends, if you don't know who Charles Johnson is by now, I don't know what to tell you. Johnson was for years a stalwart fiction teacher at the University of Washington. In his retirement years, he has refocused his attention on Buddhism and writing. Now, he's publishing his first book of fiction in a very long time, a short story collection. Northwest African American Museum, 2300 S Massachusetts St, 518-6000. http://naamnw.org, 7 pm, free.

Friday, May 4: Serpent in the Heather Reading

Wenatchee sci-fi author Kay Kenyon comes to Seattle with her latest book: a tale of assassination and spiritualist cults in 1936 Britain. Kenyon will be joined in conversation by Washington sci-fi author Liana Brooks.

University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, May 5: Free Comic Book Day

See our Event of the Week column for more details. https://freecomicbookday.com/

Sunday, May 6: LeVar Burton Reads Live!

Sweet Jesus, are you going to pass up an opportunity like this? You don't want LeVar Burton to read to you? What the hell is wrong with you? Neptune Theatre, 1303 NE 45th St, https://www.facebook.com/events/188428798597299/, 8 pm, $30.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 23rd - April 29th

Monday, April 23: How to Write an Autobiographical Novel Reading

Celebrated novelist Alexander Chee's debut essay collection, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel, was one of the spring's most anticipated books. Now it's here, and he's here, and the fabulous Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore will be interviewing him. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, April 24: Four Seattle authors

Four Seattle authors who recently released new books get together to talk about their experiences. Panelists include Natalie Singer, author of California Calling; Jennifer Haupt, author of In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills; Anca L. Szilagyi, author of Daughters of the Air; and Priscilla Long, whose most recent solo title is Minding the Muse. This should be a fascinating conversation, particularly if you're interested in being a published author. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, April 25: On Edge Reading

Earlier this month, I interviewed Expedition Press founder Myrna Keliher about her show On Edge at Core Gallery. It's an exhibition of Keliher's Broken Broadside series, which is intended to be "propaganda for poets." Tonight, poets whose work has been presented in the show will read the full poems that are excerpted in the series. This should be a fun mixture of visual art and poetry. Core Gallery, 117 Prefontaine Place S, 467-4444, http://coregallery.org, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, April 26: Engage

According to press materials, "Engage is a program where University of Washington graduate students build their skills of communicating with the public about their work." Sounds fascinating! Speakers will discuss topics like microneedles, quantum computing, and climate change. There are few things in the world as inspiring as very intelligent young discussing their favorite subjects. Ada's Technical Books, 425 15th Ave, 322-1058, http://seattletechnicalbooks.com, 7 pm, $5.

Friday, April 27: Four Way Books Showcase

Four Way Books is a nonprofit publisher of poetry and short fiction. Tonight, they present four of their latest authors. Nathan McClain's Scale is a poetry collection about sons and fathers. Rest by Margaree Little is a poetry collection about the 253 dead bodies found on the Arizona-Mexico border in a year. Carol Moldaw's book of poems, Beauty Refracted, is about time and grief and loss. And Bruce Willard's Violent Blues is billed as "a blues-harp album of words." Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7 pm, free.

Saturday, April 28: Independent Bookstore Day

See our Event of the Week column for more details. See https://www.facebook.com/SEABookstoreDay/ for more information.

Sunday, April 29: Pete Souza

The last time Obama's official White House Photographer came to town to promote his book of Obama photographs, his book was sold out everywhere and the audiences were entirely insane. Now, he's still a crazy-popular author, but Elliott Bay is sure to still have copies of the book available for sale. Come get nostalgic for a time when adults ran the country. The Moore Theater, 1932 2nd Ave, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, $57.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 16th - April 22nd

Monday, April 16: Subcontinental Drift

The local open mic night "celebrating South Asian culture" celebrates spring with new work on the theme "Transitions." Event copy says "Our performers come to a safe-space to share comedy sketches, prose they've written, spoken-word they're inspired by, music they want to perform, and of course, dance." Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave, subdriftsea@gmail.com, https://www.facebook.com/events/164396617594662/, $10.

Tuesday, April 17: Love and Trouble Reading

Seatte Times columnist Nicole Brodeur joins memoirist Claire Dederer in conversation to celebrate the paperback publication of her midlife memoir, Love and Trouble. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.*

Wednesday, April 18: Sandra O'Dell and Cat Rambo

Two sci-fi authors, Sandra Odell and Cat Rambo, talk about their most recent books. Odell's short story collection is titled Godfall and Other Stories. Rambo is the author of Hearts of Tabat, which is the second book in a series about a city that is going through tremendous societal upheaval.
.University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, April 19: Dock Street Salon

Two local authors who have published new novels in the last few months, Anca Szilágyi (author of Daughters of the Air) and Ross McMeekin (author of The Hummingbirds), will read and discuss what it's like to publish a new book. Phinney Books, 7405 Greenwood Ave. N, 297-2665, http://phinneybooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, April 20: Look Alive Out There Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Saturday, April 21: Cats Vs. Dogs

Seattle Review of Books contributor Ivan Schneider will combat writer Zack Davisson on a topic that has plagued mankind for thousands of years: which is better - dogs or cats? This is a debate and an examination of two of our most-loved mammals. The Grocery, 3001 21st Ave S, 7 pm, $5-20.

Sunday, April 22: Poetry y tTaducción: A Bilingual Reading

Poets Eugenia Toledo and Francisco Aragón will read poems in English and Spanish and discuss the pitfalls and pleasures of translation. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 5 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 9th - April 15th

Monday, April 9: Make Trouble Reading

Cecile Richards is president of both the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. Her book Make Trouble is about her life - protesting the Vietnam War as a child, growing up as the daughter of fabulous Texas governor Ann Richards, and fighting regressive anti-woman forces in her role at Planned Parenthood. Tonight, she'll be in conversation with Lindy West, who is having a big week — West is also interviewing author Samantha Irby at University Temple on Wednesday, April 11th, and she's headlining at Benaroya Hall on Sunday, an event that is our sponsorship this week. University Temple, 1415 NE 43rd St,634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, $27.

Tuesday, April 10: Lawn Boy Reading

You'll be hearing more about Jonathan Evison's new novel Lawn Boy around here in short order. It's a book about a poor young man who barely makes a living as a landscaper on Bainbridge Island. Tonight is Evison's Seattle debut of the book, which is always a special event. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, April 11: Parts Per Million Reading

See our Event of the Week Column for more details. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, April 12: Chemistry Reading

Weike Wang's Chemistry was one of the most critically praised novels of last year. Finally, the coming-of-age novel is coming out in paperback. Wang will be discussing the book's success and its themes of race, success, and indecision with Seattle author Kristen Millares Young. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Friday, April 13: Jasmine Gervais

Seattle-area painter, sculptor, and passionate feminist rights activist Jasmine Gervais examines ideas of sexuality and society in her work. Among other works she's created, she has made these funny and oddly touching tableaus of people in the midst of what appear to be half-clothed, drunken hookups. The advertising copy for this event invites you to come see and discuss her work in "an anti-gravity, gloriously inclusive environment." Greenwood Space Travel Supply Co., 8414 Greenwood Ave N, https://www.greenwoodspacetravelsupply.com/, 6 pm, free.

Saturday, April 14: Grief and Release: Poetry as Elegy

Hugo House's craft talk series continues with poet Ada Limón, who will celebrate National Poetry Month with a discussion about poetry and grief. Limón has a new book of poetry out this summer, and it seems quite possible that she might debut some of that work here at this reading tonight. Frye Art Museum. 704 Terry Ave., 622-9250, http://fryemuseum.org, 7 pm, $15.

Sunday, April 15: Examining Our Earth Through Poems

April is National Poetry Month. April is also the month in which Earth Day happens. This event at Open Books combines those two worthy pursuits by asking poets to discuss "what environmentalism looks like and how it intersects with other injustices faced today." Seattle's Youth Poet Laureate Lily Baumgart hosts a reading and discussion about sustaining our planet featuring local talents Aisha Al-Amin, Quenton Baker, Namaka Auwee-Dekker, and Sierra Nelson. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 5 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from April 2nd - April 8th

Monday, April 2: Turn This Book Into a Beehive Reading

This is a reading for a book that explains bees to children. But that's burying the lede. This is "a book that turns into a working beehive to house a colony of friendly, efficient-and non-stinging!-mason bees." Holy fucking shit! Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, April 3: The Consciousness Instinct Reading

Michael S. Gazzaniga is a neuroscientist. His latest book examines the couple handfuls of goop inside our skulls that somehow manages to simultaneously sit there doing nothing and also deliver us the entire universe with very little effort. PATH Auditorium, 2201 Westlake Avenue, 7:30 pm.

Wednesday, April 4: Reading Through It Book Club

The post-Trump book club from the Seattle Review of Books and the Seattle Weekly meets every month to discuss a single aspect of our garbage current events. Sometimes we come away feeling a little more hopeful! Today's selection is Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4Chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right by Angela Nagle. Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, April 5: Rebecca Brown and Nico Vassilakis

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Gallery 1412, 1412 18th Ave, 7 pm, free.

Friday, April 6: Songs of Dismantling Reading

According to press materials, Fernando Pérez's debut collection of poems "employs lyric and nonce forms to interrogate identity politics and piece together a complex family history." Here's the thing: even if the book was bad — and it doesn't look like it will be — Pérez is debuting the book with three great local poets. Bojan Louis, Naa Akua, and Jane Wong will help see the book into the world. That alone is good reason to show up. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org., 7 pm, free.

**Saturday, April 7: Democracy in Chains Reading**

Nancy MacLean, who teaches public policy at Duke University, comes to town with her in-depth exploration of extreme conservatism, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America. Greenwood Senior Center, 525 N 85th St, 4 pm, $5.

*Sunday, April 8: Writers Read

Local authors read new work and answer your questions about the writing life, and then you get an opportunity to read your own work at an open mic.

Seattle Public Library, Columbia City Branch, 4721 Rainier Ave S, 386-1908, http://spl.org, 2 pm, free.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from March 26th - April 1st

Monday, March 26: Love Hate Repeat Reading

Set on the University of Washington campus, Love Hate Repeat is a novel about a couple that gets together, breaks up, and gets back together again. They're kind of a clusterfuck but that's kind of the point. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/, 7 pm, free.

Tuesday, March 27: Chain Letter S2E2

The second episode of the second season of the popular new-ish Capitol Hill readings series features authors Taylor Bereiter, C.T. McGaha, Alida Hammond, and the fantastically named Patrick Galactic. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com, 7 pm, free.

Wednesday, March 28: The House of Broken Angels Reading

Luis Alberto Urrea's latest novel is about a family of immigrants. The story is based on Urrea's own family history, but it gains a certain immediacy in the age of President Trump Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org, 7 pm, free.

Thursday, March 29: The Way of the Writer Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Annex Theatre. 1100 E Pike St, http://hugohouse.org, 7 pm, $15.

Friday, March 30: Laura Lippman and David Simon

Laura Lippman has written over 20 works of detective fiction and has won a butt-ton of awards. David Simon created The Wire, which is a TV show that you wanted to hate because nobody could shut up about it but then you watched it and it was really just that brilliant. Tonight, they'll appear together onstage, thanks to Seattle Arts & Lectures. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, http://lectures.org, 7:30 pm, $20-80.

Saturday, March 31: Sorting Room Residency Reading

The most important thing that a writer needs is peace and quiet. Seattle7Writers offers a low-key residency called The Sorting Room, which is a humble room for writers to write in. Tonight, three Sorting Room residents - Matthew Bennett, Janet Buttenwiser and Sierra Nelson - will share work they've written in the room. This event will also raise awareness for Seattle 7 Writers' Pocket Library program, which donates books to "shelters, food banks, correctional facilities, and other places with readers in need of books."

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com, 7 pm, free.

Sunday, April 1: Zeina Hashem Beck, Chelsea Jennings

Lebanese poet Zeina Hashem Beck reads from her second collection, Louder than Hearts. Seattle poet Chelsea Jennings just published her first collection, Transmission Loss this spring. Together, they'll read and talk about what it's like to be published poets.

Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St, 633-0811, http://openpoetrybooks.com, 7 pm, free.