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Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from November 2 - November 8

Wednesday November 2: Short Run International Comix Night

In just a few years, Seattle’s own Short Run Comix & Arts Festival has gone from a zine show packed into the Vera Project to an international affair. Tonight, Short Run brings four worldly cartoonists — from Lebanon, Greece, Belgium, Mexico, and Croatia — to the downtown library to discuss the universal language of comics. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday November 3rd: Poets! A Dynamic Group Reading

What a stellar lineup of poets: Amaranth Borsuk, Don Mee Choi, Jennifer Kronovet, Sarah Mangold, Sarah Rosenthal, and Jane Wong. All these authors have published new work recently, and Choi is also hard at work translating Korean poets into English. If you haven’t fallen in love with a new poet this year, this reading will do the trick. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday November 4th: Hugo Literary Series: Animals

With its big bar and swanky chandelier, Fred Wildlife Refuge is a terrific temporary home for Hugo House’s Literary Series. Tonight’s readers include short story author Kirstin Valdez Quade, novelist Alexander Chee, and Seattle’s own Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, along with The Royal Oui, all producing new work around the theme of “animals.” Fred Wildlife Refuge, 128 Belmont Ave. E., 322-7030. http://www.hugohouse.org. $10-25. All ages. 7:30 p.m

Saturday November 5th: Short Run Comix & Arts Festival

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Fisher Pavillion, Seattle Center. http://shortrun.org. Free. All ages. 11 a.m.

Sunday November 6th: The Cascadia Poetry Festival

It’s a big weekend for Seattle festivals. Yesterday saw the Short Run Comix & Arts Festival, and the Cascadia Poetry Festival has been happening all weekend long at the Spring Street Center. This off-campus reading features three titans of Cascadian poetry: Sam Hamill, Brenda Hillman, and Colleen McElroy. Open Books, 2414 N. 45th St., 633-0811, openpoetrybooks.com. Free. All ages. 4 p.m.

Monday November 7th: Hood: Trailblazer of the Genomics Age Reading

The next few years are likely going to do for biology what the late 1990s did for the internet. And we owe it all to Lee Hood, the biologist who led the charge to sequence the genome. Journalist Luke Timmerman reads from his new biography of Hood, which includes never-before-seen files and memories of the man. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday November 8th: Ghost Talkers Reading

You don’t get to do anything tonight unless you’ve already voted. Sorry, it’s the rules. But if you’ve voted and you want to do something besides be anxious while waiting for returns, why not attend a reading by sci-fi author Mary Robinette Kowal, who’ll read from her new novel about a ghost army in World War I? University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from October 19th - October 25th

Wednesday October 19th: Margin Shift

Four poets — Elizabeth J. Cohen, Natasha Kochicheril Moni, Kelle Grace Gaddis, and Nadine Antoinette Maestas — read new work at the Seattle poetry collective’s latest gathering. Gaddis and Maestas are both UW graduates, Colen is a teacher at Western Washington University, and Moni was published by fabulous local press Two Sylvias. Common AREA Maintenance, 2125 2nd Ave, (253) 224-0746. http://commonartspace.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday October 20th: Libraroke

If you’re looking for a rare karaoke tune, the wizards at ggnzla Karaoke are your best bet in town. (They have “Mama Said Knock You Out” on rotation.) Tonight, you can join Seattle Public librarians with booze and “bookish” karaoke. Drink literary-themed cocktails and talk books until you’re slurring your words. Bar Sue, 1407 14th Ave, 328-0888, http://spl.org. Free. 21+. 9 p.m.

Friday October 21st: Overpour Reading

Seattle poet Jane Wong is a phenomenal talent. She’s young for a poet, but she’s already won a ton of awards and recognitions (the Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize, the Kundiman fellowship) and tonight she’s debuting her first full-length poetry collection, Overpour. Tonight’s the night when a promising, impressive talent finally becomes a celebrated author. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday October 22nd: The Elements and Rock Is Not Dead

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details.

The Elements: Love City Love, 1406 E Pike St., http://twitter.com/lovecitylove. Free. All ages. 7 pm.

Rock Is Not Dead: Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 925 E. Pike St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday October 23rd: Les Amants Book Brunch

Word Lit Zine publisher Jekeva Phillips celebrates the launch of her new poetry collection, Les Amants: Lovers and Other Strangers, with a Sunday brunch reading featuring mimosas and pastries. I’ve been writing about literary events in this city for over a decade now, and this, weirdly, is the first brunch-themed book launch I can recall.Common AREA Maintenance, 2125 2nd Ave, (253) 224-0746. http://commonartspace.com. Free. 21+. 11 a.m.

Monday October 24th: The Wangs vs. the World Reading

Debut authors are storming the gates at Elliott Bay this week: Brit Bennett reads from her much-acclaimed The Mothers on Tuesday, but for my money Jade Chang’s novel about a Chinese-American family that suffers a streak of bad luck is the one to beat. Her reading tonight should be funny, smart, and fascinating. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday October 25th: #Journalismsowhite

Seattle has its fair share of intelligent, curious, thoughtful journalists, but GodDAMN is the Seattle journalism scene incredibly white. Like, blindingly so. Tonight, a panel of journalists from outlets like the Globalist, the South Seattle Emerald, and Grist get together to discuss what this homogeneity means and how to diversify the scene. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from October 5th - October 11th

Wednesday October 5th: Rolling Blackouts Reading

With her ear for powerful, personal stories, new-to-Seattle cartoonist Sarah Glidden is the finest journalist to hit comics since Joe Sacco first put pen to paper. Her latest book, Rolling Blackouts, is a powerful piece of reportage that investigates what the Iraq War was like for ordinary people in the Middle East. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Alternate Wednesday October 5th: Contagious Exchanges

At the Seattle Review of Books, we take conflicts of interest seriously. And so because I’m hosting the post-reading Q&A with Sarah Glidden at Elliott Bay Book Company, I also want to provide you with another option for a reading. And this is an important one: Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore’s new series featuring “Queer Writers in Conversation,” Contagious Exchanges, kicks off with incredible local author Rebecca Brown and artist C. Davida Ingram. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday October 6th: Pongo Housewarming

Pongo Teen Writing is an incredible local program in which volunteers teach young people in juvenile detention centers, psychiatric wards, and homeless shelters around the region how to express themselves through poetry. Tonight, Pongo settles into its new home in Washington Hall with a reading from amateur and professional writers. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, http://pongoteenwriting.org. Free. All ages. 6:30 p.m.

Friday October 7th: Celebrating Filipino-American Elders

Members of Seattle’s up-and-coming Filipino-American writing community, including Maria Batayola, Robert Flor, Donna Miscolta, Michelle Peñaloza, Jen Soriano and Maritess Zurbano, will read for and with older Filipino-Americans on Beacon Hill in a reading, open mic, and karaoke party. (Here’s a little-known fact: writers, as a rule, are fantastic at karaoke.) International Drop-In Center, 7301 Beacon Ave. S., http://www.idicseniorcenter.org. Free. All ages. 1:30 p.m.

Saturday October 8th: Atlas Obscura Presents: a Subterranean Soiree

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Underground, 614 1st Ave., http://atlasobscura.com, $60, 21+, 9 pm.

Sunday October 9th: Dog Man Reading

A whole generation of kids has grown up in the thrall of author Dav Pilkey’s baby superhero, Captain Underpants. Today, he debuts his new comic for young readers: Dog Man, another crime fighter — this one with the head of a dog and the body of a man. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday October 10th: Last Look Reading

Brilliant cartoonist Charles Burns was born and raised here in Seattle, and his masterpiece, Black Hole, is a book that practically smells like the Pacific Northwest. Burns’s latest book, Last Look, collects his three most recent titles into one volume. It’s a riff on Tintin, teen angst, and the soul-twisting power of rock music. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $10. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday October 11th: I’m Judging You Reading

Luvvie Ajayi is a Nigerian-American author who writes essays about politics, feminism, race, pop culture, and the wrongness and rightness of people on the internet. As part of a celebration of her new book I’m Judging You: The Do-Better Manual, Alayi will appear in conversation with Lindy West. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 28th - October 4th

Wednesday September 28th: Eye on India

The latest in a series of panels about the Indian/South Asian diaspora brings novelist Amitava Kumar, here with a book of essays titled, delightfully, Lunch With a Bigot; novelist Karan Mahajan; and musician Vidya Shah. The latter will perform some songs, and all will discuss what it means to be an Indian artist. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E Prospect St., 624-6600, http://seattleartmuseum.org. $10. 7 p.m.

Thursday September 29th: Writing for a Cause

At a time when Donald Trump can block newspapers he doesn’t like from covering his campaign, this is more relevant than ever: Journalists Muatasim Qazi, Frederica Jansz, and former Seattle PI reporter Mike Lewis will discuss censorship. Jansz and Qazi both came to US after facing censorship abroad, only to find new threats here. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday September 30th: A Night with Wave Books

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Fred Wildlife Refuge, 128 Belmont Ave. E., http://wavepoetry.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday October 1st: Catharsis: A Community Grief Ritual

Why wait for a funeral to cry in public and mourn? This event co-sponsored by the Hugo House and the Seattle People of Color Salon is a place for people of all backgrounds to come and “honor their emotions,” a safe space to grieve people—and places, and emotions—that are never coming back. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. Noon.

Sunday October 2nd: Seattle Writes

Once when I worked in a bookstore, a customer asked me to help him find a book he’d heard about on NPR. He explained that in the book, “a man meets another man, and there’s a conflict.” Seattle novelist Karen Finneyfrock’s latest writing class is all about how every book has conflict at its heart.Delridge Library,5423 Delridge Way SW., 733-9125, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday October 3rd: M Train Reading

Everyone is currently losing their mind over Bruce Springsteen’s new memoir, but if you’re gaga over The Boss and you haven’t read Patti Smith's second memoir, M Train, you’re missing out. Smith’s book—now out in paperback—is a literary marvel, a gorgeously written piece of art. Beat that, Bruce. University Temple Methodist Church, 1415 NE 43rd St, 634-3400-4255, http://ubookstore.com. $17.54. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday October 4th: Citizen Scientist Reading

Mary Ellen Hannibal is not a scientist — by which I mean she did not spend the better part of a decade honing her scientific understanding in a university program. But her new book extols the joys of citizen science: observing the world, researching what happens, and reporting what you see. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 21st - September 27th

Wednesday September 21st: A Gentleman in Moscow Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Folio: The Seattle Athenaem, 324 Marion St., 402-4612, http://folioseattle.org. $5. 7 p.m.

Thursday September 22nd: A Kingdom of Their Own Reading

Joshua Partlow is a Seattle native who reports on international affairs for the Washington Post. Though he’s currently based out of Mexico City, Partlow did a stint in Afghanistan that culminated in his new book, about how America’s interference in the country is now coming back to haunt us. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday September 23rd: The Constitution Today Reading

Yale professor Akhil Reed Amar is one of our leading Constitutional scholars—he even advised writers on The West Wing on Constitutional law. His new book discusses some of the most compelling political arguments of our time—from guns to gay marriage—and explains why the Constitution has so successfully grown and changed with this country. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday September 24th: Vow of Celibacy Reading

Standup comedian Erin Judge’s new coming-of-age novel is about a bisexual aspiring fashion designer with body image issues who takes a vow of celibacy in hopes of figuring out out why her life is such a mess. Judge will be joined by some other comedians, making this less of a reading and more of a mini-standup comedy festival. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday September 25th: LOSER: The Real Seattle Music Story Reading

Once upon a time, young people were flocking to Seattle to take part in its music scene. Now that young people are flocking to Seattle to take part in its online retailing scene, it’s time for Seattle media veteran Clark Humphrey to reissue his two-decade old encyclopedic guide to the movers and shakers of grunge-era Seattle. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday September 26th: Here I Am Reading

A decade ago, Jonathan Safran Foer came to Seattle for a triumphant reading to celebrate his second novel, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. Tonight he returns with his third novel, and reviews have been…less than kind. (There’s a scene where a husband makes his wife orgasm by staring at her vagina.) It’s time for some good old-fashioned literary rubbernecking. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $34.89. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday September 27th: A Voice Without the Words to Speak

This roundtable discussion about the loss of language is an inclusive, participatory discussion. Various experts—children of immigrants whose parents demanded that they speak only English, a Yakima language preservationist, and more—will discuss the importance of keeping language alive for a new generation, and what happens when a language dies.Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 14th - September 20th

Wednesday September 14th: Beacon Bards

Seattle poet Martha Silano’s splendid quarterly reading series is in transition: previously located out of a Beacon Hill coffee shop, it’s found a temporary home at Hugo House this month before moving to Third Place Books Seward Park. Tonight’s readers are David J.Daniels, Keeje Kuipers, Rachel Moritz, and Tiffany Midge. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday September 15th: The Fortunes Reading

Peter Ho Davies is one of the very finest novelists you haven’t heard of. His novel The Welsh Girl was longlisted for the Booker Prize, but his books have yet to break through the mainstream. That may change with The Fortunes, an ambitious history of America as told through a family of Chinese immigrants. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday September 16th: Play Anything Reading

Sure, you’ve heard the corporate buzzword “gamification” — the belief that if you turn any arduous task into a video game, people will clamor to do it. But game designer Ian Bogost has a different understanding of playfulness; he argues that limitations are what makes play so helpful, and by setting clear boundaries, we make life more rewarding. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday September 17th: The Underground Railraod Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday September 18th: Four Poets

Maged Zaher is, for real, one of Seattle’s best poets. His gorgeous love poems are funny, eerily true, and stridently political. Tonight he’s joined by three poets—Susan M. Schultz, who writes dense, proselike poetry; Norman Fischer, a Zen priest; and Stephen Collis, an environmental advocate from Vancouver—in a promising showcase. Gallery 1412, 1412 18th Ave, https://gallery1412dotorg.wordpress.com. $20. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday September 19th: Commonwealth Reading

If you fell in love with Ann Patchett through her high-concept novel Bel Canto, you probably know what to expect from her newest novel, Commonwealth, about a pair of families whose courses are forever altered after a wayward kiss at a party: a compelling plot, gorgeous language, and pages that practically turn themselves. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St, 621-2230, http://lectures.org. $20-85. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday September 20th: Downfall Reading

Seattle’s J.A. Jance has been writing mysteries since the Big Bang. It’s easy to forget about a consistent record like that; with dozens of bestsellers to her name, Jance spoils her readers for choice. She reads tonight from the latest in her Joanna Brady series, and she’ll discuss her creative process and her four decades as a writer in Seattle. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from September 7th to September 13th

Wednesday September 7th: Seeing the Light: Four Decades in Chinatown

Dean Wong has devoted his life to recording the Asian-American experience through photos and words. His latest book, from Seattle-area publisher of beautiful books Chin Music Press, is a tribute to Chinatowns all over North America. Wong’s interviews and portraits capture the spirit of community that makes Chinatowns from coast to coast more than just neighborhoods.
Third Place Books Seward Park, 5041 Wilson Ave S, 474-2200, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday September 8th: Too High & Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography

David B. Williams’s book is about how Seattle’s earliest white settlers decided the geology of the region is what you’d call a fixer-upper. From the Denny Regrade to what’s really underneath Pioneer Square, Williams will talk about all the ways we’ve torn Seattle apart in order to build Seattle up. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Friday September 9th: One Nation Under God

Kevin M. Kruse is the evangelical right’s worst nightmare: a professor from Princeton who has written a book that unveils the fairly modern invention of the lie that America is now and has always been a Christian nation. Kruse argues convincingly that our national obsession with a Jesus-created America began in the 1950s. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday September 10th: Stomp the Patriarchy Ball

Seattle-based all-ages arts organization The Vera Project teams up with abortion awareness organization #ShoutYourAbortion to celebrate the one-year anniversary of #SYA, featuring bands, DJs, a photobooth, and readings from three of the most important writers in town right now: Hollis Wong-Wear, Ijeoma Oluo, and Lindy West. Patriarchy’s balls are in for a terrific stompin’. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, http://washingtonhall.org. Pay what you can. All ages. 8 p.m.

Sunday September 11th: The Esoteric Book Conference

Say what you will about how Kindles are lighter than physical books; there will never be any such thing as an esoteric ebook. This international book festival offers new and used books devoted to out-of-the-ordinary knowledge. The seminars and presentations cost money, but the book fair and art show are free. William H. Foege Hall, Genome Sciences Building, University of Washington, http://esotericbookconference.com. Free- $60. All ages. 9 a.m.

Monday September 12th: Sleeping on Jupiter

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday September 13th: Jack Straw Writers

The Jack Straw Writers Program aspires to teach Seattle-area writers how to better present their work both live and on recorded audio. Tonight, three 2016 Jack Straw Writers, including poets Alison Stagner and Carolyne Wright, singer Shontina Vernon, and poet Robert Lashley, who is rightfully enjoying a hell of a year in the Seattle-media spotlight. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 31st to September 6th

Wednesday August 31: I Will Send Rain

Rae Meadows’ fourth novel, I Will Send Rain, is set against the backdrop of the mid-1930s dustbowl. It’s the kind of impressive, intensely researched work that reinvigorates an author’s career. Meadows shares the stage tonight with Seattle author Martha Brockenbrough, author of The Game of Love and Death. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday September 1: Wintering and The Gunnywolf

It takes some poets years to put out a single collection of poetry. This year, Seattle poet Megan Snyder-Camp has published two: Wintering is based on the journals of Lewis and Clark, while The Gunnywolf examines racial tensions in America through the lens of a mythological creature.

Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday September 3rd: Loop Day Party

This fall will see a movie adaptation of Ransom Riggs’s debut book for young readers, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. Today, University Book Store’s Mill Creek location celebrates the release of a new book in the series, Tales of the Peculiar, with a black-and-white costume party, a photo booth, and writing contests. University Book Store Mill Creek, 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530. ubookstore.com. Free. All ages. 4 p.m.

Labor Day Weekend: Bumbershoot Literary Stage

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Center, http://bumbershoot.org

Tuesday September 6: Everfair

Sci-fi author and book reviewer Nisi Shawl has long been a terrific supporter of Seattle’s literary scene. Tonight, Shawl debuts her novel Everfair, a steampunk recasting of the colonization of the Belgian Congo, providing Seattle an opportunity to return the favor. Shawl is one of the best sci-fi writers in town, and she deserves to be celebrated University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from August 17th - August 23rd

Wednesday August 17: Reporting the Oregon Story

Floyd McKay has been a character in Northwest media for about as long as there’s been a Northwest media, appearing as a political reporter for KGW-TV and writing for the Seattle Times and Crosscut. His new book is an account of the history of politics and media in the Northwest. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday August 18: Sun Bear

Matthew Zapruder is more than just a renowned local poet — he’s also an editor at the second best poetry publisher in the region, Wave Books. And he has a new collection coming out from the first-best poetry publisher in the region, Copper Canyon Press. Help him celebrate the release of Sun Bear, which is an awesome title.. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday August 19: Hugo House Housewarming Party & BBQ

You probably know that the Hugo House space on 11th Ave is now a deep hole in the ground. But have you visited the House’s temporary location while their new facilities are being built? Tonight, they’re making it easy by hosting a BBQ and housewarming with free sausages from nearby George’s Delicatessen and $1 cans of PBR. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org.. Free. All ages. 4 p.m

Saturday August 20: Wong/Akbar/Peñaloza/Lewis

See our Literary Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday August 21: Southwest Stories

Chief Seattle’s great-great-great-great-grandson, Ken Workman, will discuss the history of West Seattle, the future of the Duwamish peoples, and he’ll also host a lively question-and-answer session. It is not every day that you get to hear a history of this land directly from someone representing the people who were here before colonization began Delridge Library, 5423 Delridge Way SW, 773-9125, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 2 p.m.

Monday August 22: Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt

America was built on revolution, and our Constitution allows for argument as a part of the process. This gives us a natural advantage over, say, France. Sarah Jaffe’s newest book is a history of American revolutions, from those early days in New England up through Black Lives Matter and the fight for $15. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m

Tuesday August 23: Words to Color By

Certain literary snobs like to mock coloring books for adults, but fuck those guys. Coloring makes people feel good, the books are helping the bottom lines of indie bookstores, and they’re fun. Tonight, local artist Jennifer Lankenau hosts a debut and coloring party for her first coloring book. University Book Store Mill Creek, 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530. ubookstore.com. Free. All ages. Noon.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events in Seattle from August 10th - August 16th

Wednesday August 10: Train to Bombay

In her native India, Jaina Sanga has published a novel and a book of short stories. Though Sanga writes in English, has lived in the US since 1980, and currently resides in Dallas, her books have never been published here. Elliott Bay has imported her books and is throwing one of her only US events here tonight, making this a unique moment in international literature. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday August 11: Ghostly Echoes

Now that you’ve gotten Harry Potter out of your system for a while, what are you going to read? William Ritter’s Jackaby series is about a young woman who becomes the assistant of a paranormal investigator.The third book in the series is about a ghost who hires our heroes to solve her own murder. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m. PAUL

Friday August 12: Finding Time

The problem with our economy, Heather Boushey argues, is it’s based on a nuclear family system in which one adult goes to work and another adult stays home and rears children, and our systems of work and leisure have never been realigned to fit the new paradigm. Find out how she wants to fix it. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday August 13: Comics Dungeon Anniversary Week

All week long, Wallingford’s Comic Dungeon celebrates its anniversary with a big sale (graphic novels from 20 to 30 percent off!) Today, to help celebrate one of the best and longest-running shops in town, writer John Layman shows up to sign his delightfully weird food-obsessed sci-fi series Chew. Comics Dungeon, 319 NE 45th St., 545-8373, http://comicsdungeon.org. Free. All ages. 1 p.m.

Sunday August 14: Sherman Alexie Reads to Kids

Any Sherman Alexie event is worth your while. He’s quite simply the best reader in Seattle — funny, charismatic, brilliant. But he usually packs the biggest rooms in town; this is a rare chance to enjoy him in an intimate venue as he reads from his new children’s book, Thunder Boy Jr. Queen Anne Book Company, 1811 Queen Anne Ave N., 284-2427, http://qabookco.com. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday August 15: Cody Walker & Friends

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday August 16: The Looseleaf Reading Series

Four Seattle-area writers — Natasha Marin, Suzanne Bottelli, Max Oliver Delsohn, Stephanie Barbé Hammer—and one writer visiting from California — novelist Yi Shun Lai — read new work at this ongoing literary series in Chop Suey’s den. Maybe pick up a new favorite writer or two in a nontraditional reading atmosphere. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. Free. 21+. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 27th - August 2nd

Wednesday July 27: Xinjiang and the Modern Chinese State Reading

To hear Donald Trump tell it, China is supposedly that weird blob on the other side of the world that keeps screwing us with trade. For a more nuanced view, perhaps you should turn to Seattle native Justin Jacobs, who will debut his new book about the rise of China as a “national empire.”University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday July 28: Margin Shift

Seattle’s Margin Shift poetry collective presents a night of young poets. Georgia writers Ginger Ko and Lindsay Tigue will read new work, but the real reason to turn out is to see Seattle writer Bernard Grant give one of his last readings in town before he pursues his PhD in literature at the University of Cincinnati. Common AREA Maintenance, 2125 2nd Ave, (253) 224-0746. http://commonartspace.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday July 29: Arcane Comics Grand Re-Opening

Until a few months ago, Arcane Comics was arguably the best comics shop in Seattle. Now that it’s moved to Aurora, it’s definitely the best comics shop in Shoreline. Arcane celebrates its relocation with a weekend long sale, appearances by guest artists, and a big art party Saturday night starting at 8 pm. Arcane Comics, 15202 Aurora Ave North Suite A, 781-4875, arcanecomics.net. Free. All ages. 10 a.m.

Saturday July 30: A Reading of Indigenous Writers

Memoirist and Fremont Bridge Writer-in-Residence Elissa Washuta headlines an afternoon of poetry from indigenous writers. She’ll be joined by Portland poet Demian DinéYazhi’ and Brooklyn author Tommy Pico, who has written an epic poem titled IRL. Expect a lot of dark humor and more than a little manipulation of genre and form. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 4 p.m.

Sunday July 31: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Midnight Release

See our Event of the Week column for more details.

Monday August 1: Landscapes for the People Reading

National parks are an essential part of the American character. Tonight, outdoor photographers Ren and Helen Davis celebrate the centennial of America’s wondrous national parks program with a new book titled Landscapes for the People: George Alexander Grant, First Chief Photographer of the National Park Service.

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m

Tuesday August 2: Salon of Shame

Why the hell do people hold onto their embarrassing teenage writing? That’s a mystery for the ages, but Salon of Shame will make you so glad that they do. In this perennially popular event, people read their most embarrassing journal entries and school assignments for the edification of a delighted audience.

Cornish Playhouse At Seattle Center, 201 Mercer St., 726-5113, http://salonofshame.com. $20. 21+. 8 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The Best Literary Events from July 20th - July 26th

Wednesday July 20: Remembering Healing Celebrating

Five Seattle-area poets — Priscilla Long, Jack Remick, Holly Hughes, John Wright, and Bethany Reid — read new work about “the past, lost poets, extinct birds, lost loves, and extending and expanding the meanings of elegy.” One of the top three best uses of poetry is remembering. (The other two? Sex and jokes.) Third Place Books Ravenna, 6504 20th Ave NE, 525-2347 http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday July 21: You'll Grow Out Of It Reading

Inside Amy Schumer head writer Jessi Klein’s memoir addresses what it means to be a woman in the 21st century. Tonight, beloved Seattle author Lindy West will join Klein in a far-reaching conversation about femininity, the idea of being a tomboy, and whether or not it’s biologically possible for men to be funny. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://bookstore.washington.edu. $27.50. All ages. 8 p.m.

Friday July 22: Welcome to Night Vale

The horror/comedy podcast Welcome to Night Vale gets credit for being hilarious and inventive, but it’s also an impressive serial writing achievement: installment by installment, and in tonight’s live show, Welcome to Night Vale is building a mythology on the backs of American horror legends like Poe and Lovecraft. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, http://seattlesymphony.org. $27.50. All ages. 8 p.m.

Saturday July 23: Rainier BAAMFest

Today’s Rainier Beach Arts and Music Fest features visual arts, crafts, dance, and music. But because I’m a book guy, let’s focus on the literary offerings, including spoken word, graphic novel-making workshops, Coast Salish storytelling, and a performance by Seattle-area spoken word dynamo Reagan Jackson. Rainier Beach Community Center and Pool, 8825 Rainier Ave S., 386-1925, http://facebook.com/BAAMFest. Free. All ages. 11 a.m.

Sunday July 24: Alice & Lucy Will Work for Bunk Beds Reading

You know who loves going to readings? Kids. This is because kids are better than adults, who waste all their time binge-watching Law & Order and reading hot takes about Pokémon Go. Seattle author Jaime Temairik debuts her new kids’ book with a reading and a literal cake walk at her neighborhood bookstore. Secret Garden Books, 2214 NW Market St., 789-5006, http://secretgardenbooks.com, free, all ages, 1 p.m.

Monday July 25: The Heavenly Table Reading

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m

Tuesday July 26: Clarion West Presents Geoff Ryman

Geoff Ryman is probably one of the most underappreciated living legends of sci-fi. Perhaps best-known for his multi-tiered Oz-centric fantasia Was, Ryman also created a hyperlinked online novel called 253 that was decades ahead of its time. This should be a rare peek inside the mind of a singular genius. Seattle Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 13th - July 19th

Wednesday July 13: HEX Reading

Dutch author Thomas Olde Heuvelt’s horror novel HEX was a worldwide bestseller before it was even translated into English. Now it should become a bestseller in America, too; it’s got all the elements of a good horror yarn, including a witch’s curse, imperiled teens, a plague of suicides, and the fate of the known universe. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday July 14: REMEMBER ME

See our Event of the Week Column for more details. Vermillion Art Gallery and Bar, 1508 11th Ave., 709-9797, http://vermillionseattle.com. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Friday July 15: Represent This!

Beloved Greenwood hangout spot the Couth Buzzard presents a politically minded cabaret featuring music, stories, poetry, and comedy. I’m most looking forward to Seattle poet David Fewster, long a very funny open mic mainstay who just published his very first collection with the Couth Buzzard’s brand-new press. Couth Buzzard Books, 8310 Greenwood Ave N., buonobuzzard.com. Donation. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday July 16: Second Life Reading

SJ Watson writes the kind of twisty psychological thrillers that Hollywood swarms over like horny locusts. Before I Go to Sleep became a movie starring Nicole Kidman and his newest, Second Life, has already been optioned by Reese Withersppon, who also produced Gone Girl. Tonight, Watson will be interviewed onstage by Seattle memoirist Sonya Lea. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Sunday July 17: Friends of the Library Pop-up Shop

You have for sure attended the semiannual Friends of the Library book sale, right? Well, lately, the Friends have been trying something new: a mini-used bookstore that travels from branch to branch, with a small selection of quality books (mostly paperbacks and kids’ books) for just a buck a piece. Magnolia Public Library, 2801 34th Ave. W., 386-4225, splbuzz.com, free, all ages, 1 p.m.

Monday July 18: The Fire Line Reading

Due to climate change, we’ve gotten used to the annual display of out-of-control wildfires and the brave women and men who fight them. Fernanda Santos’s new book recounts one of the deadliest days in the history of firefighting, describing the kind of nightmare we might see more of in the near in future. Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday July 19: The Nordic Theory of Everything Reading

For a year, Bernie Sanders talked up the Scandinavian way of life: free health care, income and gender equality, and other so-called “socialistic” government programs. In her new book, Finnish journalist Anu Partenan discusses the values that Scandinavian government is based on and whether those philosophies are compatible with everyday life in the U.S. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from July 6th - 12th

Wednesday July 6: Collecting the Dead Signing

Former Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office crime analyst Spencer Kope brings his debut mystery/thriller Collecting The Dead to Pioneer Square’s longest-running independent bookstore. Collecting is about an FBI agent with the power to track anybody anywhere—except for the one serial killer who previously escaped his grasp. Seattle Mystery Bookshop, 117 Cherry St., 587-5737, http://seattlemystery.com. Free. All ages. Noon.

Thursday July 7: BOOM: Changing Seattle

The big editorial brains behind the upcoming anthology Ghosts of Seattle Past present new work as part of a new art show devoted to honoring Seattle “places lost, preserved and desired during moments of rapid development and growth.” With new art from C. Davida Ingram, No Touching Ground, and Rodrigo Valenzuela. Center for Architecture and Design, 1010 Western Ave., http://seattlearchitecture.org. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Friday July 8: Away with Nancy Pearl

Calling librarian Nancy Pearl a “Seattle treasure” undercuts her wide-ranging appeal; she belongs to the world now. But Seattleites do have the unique honor of attending Pearl’s monthly book club at University Book Store. This month, she’s discussing novelist Amy Bloom’s magnificent immigrant novel Away. Go bask in Pearl’s heroic literacy. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. All ages. 6:30 p.m.

Saturday July 9: Intruder Release Party

It’s a big damn celebration for the 20th and final issue of the greatest cartooning newspaper in Seattle history. Intruder staff and contributors will hand out copies of their last issue, local cartoonists and small press will present an outdoor book fair, comics genius Josh Simmons will sign books, and everyone will get a little bit weepy after drinking too many beers. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 1201 Vale St., 658-0110, http://fantagraphics.com/flog/bookstore. Free. All ages. 5 p.m.

Sunday July 10: Southern Biscuits Cooking Class

Fuck brunch. Why bother waiting in a ridiculous line with your hungover friends to pay way too much money for weird bread products when you could learn how to make nature’s perfect brunch, instead? Brian Medford of Idewild Biscuits and Bakes pop-up bakery will teach a class of ten how to make sweet and savory biscuits. Book Larder, 4252 Fremont Ave N., 397-4271, http://booklarder.com, $70, all ages, 9:30 a.m.

Monday July 11: The Lesbian Sex Haiku Book (with Cats!) Reading

Anna Pulley started writing haiku when her girlfriend dumped her. It quickly became an obsession. Now, her new collection The Lesbian Sex Haiku Book (with Cats!) boasts a gushy blurb by Tegan and Sara calling it “an adorable and hilarious way to start the day!” and urging the reader to — count these exclamation points — “Check it out!!!!” Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Tuesday July 12: Clarion West Presents N.K. Jemisin

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Public Library, 1000 4th Ave., 386-4636, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 6 pm.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 22nd - June 28th

Wednesday June 22: Grace Reading

If you’re going to attend one reading by a debut novelist this year, skip the horse-chokingly thick tour-de-force by the white-boy wunderkind from Brooklyn and attend this one instead. Narrated by a ghost—“I am dead” is the first line—Natashia Deón’s riveting Grace tells the story of black women in America’s slave trade. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday June 23: Margin Shift/Paper-son Poet Readings

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Margin Shift: 1809 E John St. All ages. Free. 7 p.m. Paper-son Poet: Couth Buzzard Books, 8310 Greenwood Ave N., http://buonobuzzard.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday June 24: Mary-Louise Parker with Sherman Alexie

Celebrity bios are often disappointments. But in talking to booksellers who’ve read advance copies of Weeds star Mary-Louise Parker’s memoir Dear Mr. You, you’ll notice that a certain relief creeps into their faces. “No,” they’ll say, “it’s actually good! It’s well-written.” Tonight, Parker will be grilled onstage by Seattle’s own Sherman Alexie. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 8 p.m.

Saturday June 25: Don’t Look Away Launch

Seattle cartoonist Seth Goodkind’s artwork has a remarkable stickiness to it; your eye can’t look away from those inky depths and finely wrought details. Tonight, he’s debuting four new minicomics including Don’t Look Away, which collects his handsome, haunting portraits of people of color killed by police officers.
Push/Pull, 5484 Shilshole Ave., 789-1710, http://pushpullseattle.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Sunday June 26: Magic and Loss Reading

Virginia Heffernan calls the internet one of “mankind’s great masterpieces.” (Is she aware that YouTube comment sections exist? Unclear.) Her new book imagines the internet as a work of art, and it discusses how our online lives are shaping human thought. Is Heffernan the Marshall McLuhan of our time, or does Reddit render her argument invalid? Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Monday June 27: Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching Reading

Mychal Denzel Smith’s new book frankly discusses race in America. It opens with the murder of Trayvon Martin and touches on topics like Black Lives Matter and the challenge of black masculinity. If you think you don’t need to read it because you’ve already read Between the World and Me, you’re part of the problem Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday June 21: Fight Club 2 and The Clasp

Elliott Bay Book Company hosts two authors who couldn’t be more aesthetically opposed. At 4 pm, Chuck Palahniuk signs his Fight Club sequel comic, the inventively titled Fight Club 2. Then at 7 pm, Sloane Crosley reads from her smart, funny, and smartly funny novel The Clasp. You’re either a Crosley person or a Palahniuk person; which is it gonna be? Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 8th - June 14th

Wednesday June 8: Homegoing Reading

It’s hard to turn anyone’s head with a dust jacket blurb these days, but the rare appearance of a Ta-Nehisi Coates blurb on Yaa Gyasi’s debut novel Homegoing — calling the book an “inspiration” and citing its “so fully realized, so elegantly carved” characters — is a rare meaningful instance. It announces this book as something worth your time. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday June 9: Graphic Masters Opening Night

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave, 654-3100, http://seattleartmuseum.com. Free. All ages. 5 pm.

Friday June 10: Writers Opening Night

For months now, Seattle artist Christine Marie Larsen has created portraits of local and historical literary figures as a weekly feature here on the Seattle Review of Books. Tonight, she’s debuting her first show of author portraits, with three of her subjects — Maged Zaher, Sarah Galvin, and Lesley Hazleton — in attendance. Plus: a Little Free Library! Essentia, 2008 1st Ave, 441-0321, http://pushpullseattle.weebly.com. Free. All ages. 6 p.m.

Saturday June 11: Used Book Sale at Third Place Books

The best bookstores are the ones that have used books mixed in with the new books. Today at all three Third Place Books locations, including the beautiful new Seward Park store, all used books in stock are 40 percent off their sticker price. Go buy a stack of books the length of your arm, guilt-free. Third Place Books locations, http://thirdplacebooks.com, 366-3333, Free. All ages. 9 a.m.

Sunday June 12: Sci-fi Bike Ride

New-to-Seattle author Adam Rakunas celebrates his new novel about an interplanetary labor union, Like a Boss, with a bike ride featuring fellow sci-fi/fantasy authors Laura Anne Gilman and Brenda Cooper. The ride starts at Husky Stadium Station at noon and continues for 2.6 miles to Café Solsticio in Fremont for a 1 pm reading. Café Solsticio, 1110 N. Northlake Way 547-0404, http://solsticiofremont.com/. Free. All ages. 1 p.m.

Monday June 13: Leveraging Female Political Power

It’s clear that women will decide the election this November, either by showing up to vote against Donald Trump or by staying home out of disgust at the electoral process. Time magazine reporter Jay Newton-Small will share everything she knows about American women and democracy—from Hillary Clinton’s dealmaking to surprising demographic information—in a talk tonight. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday June 14: Sweet Lamb of Heaven Reading

Lydia Millett’s delightfully creepy novels are full of sticky secrets and missing people and monstrous obsessions. Tonight she’s joined by Seattle’s own Stacey Levine—herself no stranger to bizarre and uncomfortable fictions. This pairing makes so much sense it’s ridiculous; these two writers will either become best friends or they’ll light each other on fire. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from June 1st - June 7th

Wednesday June 1: Ancient Soil Reading

UW grad student Julia Kelson has done groundbreaking new work in the field of climate change. Kelson is predicting the future of global warming by investigating the past, using soil to find periods in ancient earth when carbon dioxide levels were similar to now. Are we doomed? Stay tuned. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday June 2: Contagious Exchanges: Queer Writers in Conversation

See our Event of the Week column for more details. Hugo House, 1021 Columbia St., 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday June 3: Sweetbitter Reading

Stephanie Danler’s debut novel is about a young woman who moves to New York City to make it big in the restaurant world. “Eating becomes a discipline language-obsessed,” Danler writes early in Sweetbitter. “You will never simply eat food again.” It’s a novel about senses and sensation, which is to say it’s about being alive. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday June 4: The Poet Is In

Seattle’s very first Civic Poet, Claudia Castro Luna, takes her charge seriously. For the last month, she’s been on a mission with the help of Seattle Public Library to teach Seattleites how to explore their neighborhoods through poetry. This afternoon, she’s hosting a reading of poems written in previous sessions. Seattle Public Library Southwest Branch, 9010 35th Ave. S.W., 684-7455, http://spl.org. Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Sunday June 5: King of the Worlds Reading

M. Thomas Gammarino’s new book from Seattle publisher Chin Music Press is a hyperactive science fiction road trip about an actor who loses the lead role in Titanic and then travels across time and space in the throes of a “trans-dimensional midlife crisis.” After his reading, I’ll be joining Gammarino for a talk. James Cameron will be discussed. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, http://www2.bookstore.washington.edu/. Free. 3 p.m.

Alternate Sunday June 5: The Face: A Time Code Reading

Ruth Ozeki’s A Time Code is the best of three debut books in the new series The Face, in which authors write book-length essays about their own faces. (I reviewed it a few months ago.) In her outing, Ozeki stares at her own face in the mirror for hours at a time, and records her reaction. It’s a story about meditation, vanity, gender, and aging, from one of the best writers in the Northwest. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday June 6: Ask the Oracle

This reading series adds an air of mystery to the literary experience. Audience members ask for advice (Should I leave my boyfriend? Should I move?) and Seattle-area authors divine the answers from their own books. Tonight’s fortune-tellers include poet Jane Wong, essayist David Schmader, and novelist Bruce Holbert. Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St., 622-6400, http://hotelsorrento.com. Free. 21 and over. 7 p.m.

Tuesday June 7: Vaseline Buddha Reading

Jung Young Moon is a prominent experimental South Korean author who is finally debuting a translation of one of his novels in America. Vaseline Buddha is about the events surrounding the funeral of a goldfish named Kierkegaard. Moon’s publisher compares him to Kafka or Beckett, and this is an incredibly rare stateside appearance. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 25th - May 31st

Wednesday May 25: Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman Reading

See the Event of the Week column. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday May 26: White Sands Reading

Geoff Dyer writes nimbly about difficult concepts that are exceptionally difficult for most writers to explain; he once wrote a book about not writing a book about D.H. Lawrence. White Sands is about travel, and the idea of travel, and living in the world; I can’t explain it, but I know Dyer can. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Friday May 26: Paper: Paging Through History Reading

In both Cod and Salt, Mark Kurlansky wrote huge, well-researched books about seemingly tiny topics which expand into nuanced histories of the entire world. His newest, Paper, promises to do the same trick with paper and the written word, though it also looks forward, at the prospect (threat?) of a paperless future. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Saturday May 28: Almost Live: The Show That Wouldn’t Die Reading

Now that we’re a world-class city with our very own giant Amazon balls, it’s hard to remember that Seattle used to have its own local low-budget Saturday Night Live. Bryan Johnston’s history of Almost Live includes interviews with nearly every cast member, making it a must-read for the three natural-born Seattleites who can still afford to live here. Third . Third Place Books Lake Forest Park, 17171 Bothell Way NE, 366-3333, http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages. 6:30 p.m.

Sunday May 29: Literary Events at Fokllife

All weekend long Folklife hosts literary events like readings from the youth-poetry saints of Pongo Publishing, Greg Vandy’s book about Woody Guthrie, and more. On Sunday alone, you can find a whole bunch of children’s storytelling events and a reading from the Jack Straw Fellows hosted by beloved local poetry advocate Kathleen Flenniken. Seattle Center, http://nwfolklife.org. Free. All ages. 11 A.M.

Monday May 30: Author: The JT LeRoy Story Screening

In the late 1990s, everyone was obsessed with JT LeRoy, a media-shy author who wrote thinly veiled novels about his own life as a drug-addicted homeless youth. Then, LeRoy was outed as a middle-aged woman named Laura Albert. Jeff Feuerzeig’s documentary about LeRoy/Albert is coming to SIFF, and today I’ll be joining him for a post-screening interview. Shoreline Community College, 16101 Greenwood Ave. N., 464.5830, http://siff.net. $13. All ages. 3 p.m.

Tuesday May 31: Tribe Reading

Sebastian Junger is not just one of the dreamiest authors alive—he’s a hottie who fearlessly launches himself into dangerous situations—he’s also one of the most compassionate. His newest book, Tribe, documents the many pitfalls that befall veterans when they return to normal life in America, including suicide, PTSD, and drug Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 18 - May 24

Wednesday May 18: The Furnace

The Furnace reading series features a local writer reading a single story with audio effects from the good folks at Hollow Earth Radio. This month, Christine Texeria reads “Immanent Ghosthood,” the story of a father, a daughter, and Mortal Kombat. Chapbooks of the story will be available for sale at this live broadcast. Hollow Earth Radio, 2018 E. Union St., 617-1683, https://thefurnaceseattle.wordpress.com/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Thursday May 19: Where the House Was

Hugo House co-founder Frances McCue reads from a long poem about the House that will be incorporated into a documentary about the writing center’s closure, transition, and eventual reopening. She’ll be joined by Rebecca Brown, cellist Lori Goldston, and former House students Cali Kopczick and Jack Chelgren. Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday May 20: Writing on the Wall

Here it finally is: the final event at the Richard Hugo House in its current incarnation is an outing of their Literary Series, in which novelists Jenny Offill, Laura van den Berg, artist Dawn Cerny, and poet Maged Zaher all produce new work on the theme “Writing on the wall.” Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. $25. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday May 21: Seward Park Third Place Books Grand Opening

See our Event of the Week column. Seward Park Third Place Books, 5041 Wilson Ave S., http://thirdplacebooks.com. Free. All ages.

Sunday May 22: Word Works

Memoirist Domingo Martinez offers a craft talk on the topic of “Fearlessness.” Fans of Martinez’s two books, The Boy Kings of Texas and My Heart Is a Drunken Compass, often ask him if he’s afraid to hurt people in his life by writing about them. Tonight, he provides a comprehensive answer. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 3 p.m.

Monday May 23: Flip a Coin at Town Hall

Upstairs at Town Hall tonight, Siddhartha Mukkherjhee, who is best known for his biography of cancer The Emperor of All Maladies, reads from his latest: The Gene: An Intimate History. Downstairs, Nathaniel Philbrick reads from Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution. Can’t decide which to attend? Flip a coin. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday May 24: Thunder Boy Jr Reading

Sherman Alexie is probably Seattle’s best-known author, and hands-down our most entertaining reader. Tonight, he debuts his very first picture book, Thunder Boy Jr, which is about the trouble with being a junior, of not even owning your own name. (Alexie’s full name is Sherman Alexie Jr., so he knows what he’s talking about. University Temple United Methodist Church, 1415 NE 43rd St., 634-3400, http://ubookstore.com. $17.99. All ages. 7 p.m.

Your Week in Readings: The best literary events from May 11 - May 17

Wednesday May 11: Becoming the Virgin

Austin writer Taylor Jacob Pate is traveling the country to celebrate the publication of his first book of poetry, Becoming the Virgin. He’s joined tonight by Seattle poets Sarah León and Jane Wong. Any bill with Wong on it deserves your attention; she’s fast becoming one of the biggest names in Seattle poetry. The Pine Box, 1600 Melrose Ave, 588-0375, http://pineboxbar.com. Free. 21+. 8 p.m.

Thursday May 12: The Game of Love and Death

Racist jackasses recently trolled an Old Navy Twitter ad because it showed a mixed-race couple. This makes Martha Brockenbrough’s The Game of Love and Death more than just a novel about a white boy and an African-American girl who fall in love and become entwined in a cosmic game of fate; it’s now a political statement. Queen Anne Book Company, 1811 Queen Anne Ave N., 284-2427, http://qabookco.com. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Friday May 13: Working Stiffs

This reading series asks writers to share their stories of work. Not, like, their writing process, but actual jobs that pay actual money in exchange for actual dignity. Today’s readers include former Seattle Magazine editor Brangien Davis and excellent Seattle poet Quenton Baker. And, as with every Working Stiffs event: free Top Pot doughnuts! Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave, 322-7030, http://hugohouse.org. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Saturday May 14: Breakfast with Neruda

Pablo Neruda is so hot right now. His lost poems were recently discovered and published by Port Townsend’s Copper Canyon Press, and now Laura Moe has published Breakfast with Neruda, a young adult novel about a pair of teens who bond over the 20th century’s greatest love poet.University Book Store Mill Creek, 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530. http://ubookstore.com. Free. All ages. Noon.

Sunday May 15: Mangold, Queen, and Vogel

This event from the Institute for New Connotative Action (INCA) promises some brainy literary action for your Sunday. Seattle poet Sarah Mangold (editor of the sadly defunct Bird Dog magazine and author of Electrical Theories of Femininity)is joined by Talena Queen and Danielle Vogel, who are both out at the cutting edge of literature. INCA, 2 W. Roy St., http://incainstitute.org/. Free. All ages. 7 p.m.

Monday May 16: We Were Feminist Once

See our Event of the Week column. Town Hall Seattle, 1119 8th Ave., 652-4255, http://townhallseattle.org. $5. All ages. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday May 17: Boy Erased

Garrard Conley’s new memoir, Boy Erased is about the trauma of growing up gay in the south. Conley’s story is thick with prejudice, violence, and the heartbreaking psychological trauma caused by ex-gay therapy, but he still finds room in his heart for forgiveness and gratitude. Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 10th Ave, 624-6600, http://elliottbaybook.com . Free. All ages. 7 p.m.